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Author Notes:

Dr Modele O. Ogunniyi, Emory University School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, 49 Jesse Hill Jr Drive SE, Atlanta, Georgia 30303, USA. Email: modele.ogunniyi@emory.edu

Dr Ogunniyi has received institutional research grants from AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, and Zoll; and has been an advisory board member for Pfizer. Dr Fatade is supported by the Stimulating Access to Research in Residency of the National Institutes of Health under award number R38AI140299. Dr Quesada is supported by the National Institutes of Health under award number K23 HL151867. Dr Mattina has received speaker fees from Zoll. Dr Ovbiagele is supported by research grants from the National Institutes of Health; and is a consultant and an advisory board member for AstraZeneca. The contents of this paper are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent official views of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. All other authors have reported that they have no relationships relevant to the contents of this paper to disclose.

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems
  • Cardiovascular System & Cardiology
  • Black women
  • cardiovascular disease
  • disparities
  • health equity
  • heterogeneity
  • race/ ethnicity
  • social determinants of health
  • COMMUNITY-HEALTH WORKERS
  • RACIAL DISPARITIES
  • AFRICAN-AMERICAN
  • ETHNIC DISPARITIES
  • HEART-FAILURE
  • UNITED-STATES
  • MORTALITY
  • CARE
  • STROKE
  • RISK

Eliminating Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease for Black Women JACC Review Topic of the Week

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Journal Title:

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY

Volume:

Volume 80, Number 18

Publisher:

, Pages 1762-1771

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Black women are disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease with an excess burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In addition, the racialized structure of the United States shapes cardiovascular disease research and health care delivery for Black women. Given the indisputable evidence of the disparities in health care delivery, research, and cardiovascular outcomes, there is an urgent need to develop and implement effective and sustainable solutions to advance cardiovascular health equity for Black women while considering their ethnic diversity, regions of origin, and acculturation. Innovative and culturally tailored strategies that consider the differential impact of social determinants of health and the unique challenges that shape their health-seeking behaviors should be implemented. A patient-centered framework that involves collaboration among clinicians, health care systems, professional societies, and government agencies is required to improve cardiovascular outcomes for Black women. The time is “now” to achieve health equity for all Black women.

Copyright information:

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
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