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Author Notes:

Jaimie L. Gradus, Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Email: jgradus@bu.edu

Subject:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health (R01MH110453; PI: Jamie L. Gradus)

Keywords:

  • Social Sciences
  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Psychology, Clinical
  • Psychiatry
  • Psychology
  • POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER
  • PSYCHIATRIC-DISORDERS
  • COMORBIDITY
  • EXPOSURE
  • PTSD
  • VICTIMIZATION
  • EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • VALIDATION
  • DIAGNOSES
  • SYSTEM

Using Danish national registry data to understand psychopathology following potentially traumatic experiences

Tools:

Journal Title:

JOURNAL OF TRAUMATIC STRESS

Volume:

Volume 35, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages 619-630

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Research on posttraumatic psychopathology has focused primarily on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); other posttraumatic psychiatric diagnoses are less well documented. The present study aimed to (a) develop a methodology to derive a cohort of individuals who experienced potentially traumatic events (PTEs) from registry-based data and (b) examine the risk of psychopathology within 5 years of experiencing a PTE. Using data from Danish national registries, we created a cohort of individuals with no age restrictions (range: 0–108 years) who experienced at least one of eight possible PTEs between 1994 and 2016 (N = 1,406,637). We calculated the 5-year incidence of nine categories of ICD-10 psychiatric disorders among this cohort and examined standardized morbidity ratios (SMRs) comparing the incidence of psychopathology in this group to the incidence in a nontraumatic stressor cohort (i.e., nonsuicide death of a relative; n = 423,270). Stress disorders (2.5%), substance use disorders (4.1%), and depressive disorders (3.0%) were the most common diagnoses following PTEs. Overall, the SMRs for the associations between any PTE and psychopathology varied from 1.9, 95% CI [1.9, 2.0], for stress disorders to 5.2, 95% CI [5.1. 5.3], for personality disorders. All PTEs except pregnancy-related trauma were associated with all forms of psychopathology. Associations were consistent regardless of whether a stress disorder was present. Traumatic experiences have a broad impact on psychiatric health. The present findings demonstrate one approach to capturing trauma exposure in medical record registry data. Increased traumatic experience characterization across studies will help improve the field's understanding of posttraumatic psychopathology.
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