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Author Notes:

Angela Weyand, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Medical Professional Building Rm D4202, 1500 E Medical Center Dr, SPC 5718, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA. Email: aceyand@med.umich.edu

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Hematology
  • bleeding
  • hemarthrosis
  • hemophilia
  • menstruation
  • nomenclature
  • von willebrand disease
  • women's health
  • BONE-MINERAL DENSITY
  • IRON-DEFICIENCY
  • ISTH-BAT
  • CARRIERS
  • MANAGEMENT
  • PHENOTYPE
  • CHILDREN
  • PATTERNS
  • FEMALES
  • ASSOCIATION

Health issues in women and girls affected by haemophilia with a focus on nomenclature, heavy menstrual bleeding, and musculoskeletal issues

Tools:

Journal Title:

HAEMOPHILIA

Volume:

Volume 28, Number S4

Publisher:

, Pages 18-25

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Introduction: Women and girls affected by haemophilia, including haemophilia carriers (WGH) are at risk of bleeding symptoms that may go unrecognized, including heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) and musculoskeletal bleeding. Terminology continues to evolve. Aim: To describe the current recommendations for nomenclature surrounding WGH, and the current understanding of HMB, iron deficiency, and musculoskeletal complaints in these patients. Methods: Literature was reviewed and summarized. Results: With regards to nomenclature, women with factor levels less than 50% should be classified as having haemophilia, while carriers with normal levels should be characterized accordingly to symptomatology. HMB and resultant iron deficiency are common among WGH, have a multitude of downstream effects, and maybe overlooked due to stigma around menstruation. Musculoskeletal bleeding and resultant joint changes are increasingly recognized in this population but do not necessarily correlate with factor levels. Conclusion: Although progress has been made in the care of WGH, much work remains to further improve their care.

Copyright information:

© 2022 The Authors. Haemophilia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
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