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Author Notes:

Aron K. Barbey, barbey@illinois.edu

All authors listed have made a substantial, direct and intellectual contribution to the work, and approved it for publication.

We thank Robert N. McCauley, Nathaniel Rabb, and Adam H. Russell for improving our argument and Kyle Baacke for assistance in the preparation of the manuscript.

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

Subject:

Research Funding:

The work was supported by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), via Contract 2014-13121700004 to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (PI: AB) and the Department of Defense, Defense Advanced Research Projects Activity (DARPA), via Contract 2019-HR00111990067 to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (PI: AB).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • community of knowledge
  • cognitive neuroscience
  • thinking
  • collective cognition
  • social neuroscience
  • PARTISAN BIAS
  • ILLUSION
  • SCIENCE
  • CULTURE
  • BRAIN
  • MEMORIES
  • PARTY
  • TIME

Cognitive Neuroscience Meets the Community of Knowledge

Tools:

Journal Title:

FRONTIERS IN SYSTEMS NEUROSCIENCE

Volume:

Volume 15

Publisher:

, Pages 675127-675127

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Cognitive neuroscience seeks to discover the biological foundations of the human mind. One goal is to explain how mental operations are generated by the information processing architecture of the human brain. Our aim is to assess whether this is a well-defined objective. Our contention will be that it is not because the information processing of any given individual is not contained entirely within that individual’s brain. Rather, it typically includes components situated in the heads of others, in addition to being distributed across parts of the individual’s body and physical environment. Our focus here will be on cognition distributed across individuals, or on what we call the “community of knowledge,” the challenge that poses for reduction of cognition to neurobiology and the contribution of cognitive neuroscience to the study of communal processes.

Copyright information:

© 2021 Sloman, Patterson and Barbey.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/rdf).
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