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Author Notes:

Adam S. Wilk, Department of Health Policy and Management, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA. Email: adam.s.wilk@emory.edu

All the authors declared no competing interests.

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Urology & Nephrology
  • chronic kidney disease
  • mental illness
  • mental health treatment
  • CHRONIC KIDNEY-DISEASE
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • CLINICAL-PRACTICE GUIDELINE
  • PERITONEAL-DIALYSIS
  • CARE UTILIZATION
  • DEPRESSION
  • HEMODIALYSIS
  • ASSOCIATION
  • HOSPITALIZATION
  • PREVALENCE

National Estimates of Mental Health Needs Among Adults With Self-Reported CKD in the United States

Tools:

Journal Title:

KIDNEY INTERNATIONAL REPORTS

Volume:

Volume 7, Number 7

Publisher:

, Pages 1630-1642

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Introduction: Among adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD), comorbid mental illness is associated with poorer health outcomes and can impede access to transplantation. We provide the first US nationally representative estimates of the prevalence of mental illness and mental health (MH) treatment receipt among adults with self-reported CKD. Methods: Using 2015 to 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) data, we conducted an observational study of 152,069 adults (age ≥22 years) reporting CKD (n = 2544), with no reported chronic conditions (n = 117,235), or reporting hypertension (HTN) or diabetes mellitus (DM) but not CKD (HTN/DM, n = 32,290). We compared prevalence of (past-year) any mental illness, serious mental illness (SMI), MH treatment, and unmet MH care needs across the groups using logistic regression models. Results: Approximately 26.6% of US adults reporting CKD also had mental illness, including 7.1% with SMI. When adjusting for individual characteristics, adults reporting CKD were 15.4 percentage points (PPs) and 7.3 PPs more likely than adults reporting no chronic conditions or HTN/DM to have any mental illness (P < 0.001) and 5.6 PPs (P < 0.001) and 2.2 PPs (P = 0.01) more likely to have SMI, respectively. Adults reporting CKD were also more likely to receive any MH treatment (21% vs. 12%, 18%, respectively) and to have unmet MH care needs (6% vs. 3%, 5%, respectively). Conclusion: Mental illness is common among US adults reporting CKD. Enhanced management of MH needs could improve treatment outcomes and quality-of-life downstream.

Copyright information:

© 2022 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/rdf).
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