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Author Notes:

Jasmine Riviere Marcelin, MD, FACP, FIDSA, Assistant Professor, Infectious Diseases, Associate Medical Director, Antimicrobial Stewardship Program, Co-Director, Digital Innovation & Social Media Strategy, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 985400 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5400, USA. Email: jasmine.marcelin@unmc.edu

J. R. M. co-chairs the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/COVID-19 Prevention Network (CoVPN) vaccine study CoVPN 3006/Prevent COVID U and receives salary support for this activity, not related to this manuscript. All authors have submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest. Conflicts that the editors consider relevant to the content of the manuscript have been disclosed.

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology
  • Black
  • Indigenous
  • People of Color (BIPOC)
  • COVID-19
  • structural racism
  • vaccine confidence
  • HEALTH DISPARITIES
  • COVID-19 VACCINE
  • UNITED-STATES
  • MEDICINE
  • RACE
  • DEATHS
  • RACISM
  • ART
  • AGE
  • US

Addressing and Inspiring Vaccine Confidence in Black, Indigenous, and People of Color During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic

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Tools:

Journal Title:

OPEN FORUM INFECTIOUS DISEASES

Volume:

Volume 8, Number 9

Publisher:

, Pages ofab417-ofab417

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, we have witnessed profound health inequities suffered by Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC). These manifested as differential access to testing early in the pandemic, rates of severe disease and death 2-3 times higher than white Americans, and, now, significantly lower vaccine uptake compared with their share of the population affected by COVID-19. This article explores the impact of these COVID-19 inequities (and the underlying cause, structural racism) on vaccine acceptance in BIPOC populations, ways to establish trustworthiness of healthcare institutions, increase vaccine access for BIPOC communities, and inspire confidence in COVID-19 vaccines.

Copyright information:

© The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/rdf).
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