About this item:

83 Views | 52 Downloads

Author Notes:

Jason Cobb, jcobb2@emory.edu

Jose E. Navarrete: conception, design, data collection, analysis, interpretation of data, manuscript drafting, manuscript revision, and lead author. David C. Tong: conception, design, data collection, analysis, interpretation of data, and manuscript drafting. Jason Cobb: conception, design, data collection, interpretation of data, manuscript drafting, manuscript revision, and corresponding author. Frederic F. Rahbari-Oskoui: conception, design, interpretation of data, manuscript drafting, and manuscript revision. Darya Hosein: design, analysis, data collection, interpretation of data, and manuscript drafting. Sheryl C. Caberto: data collection, interpretation of data, and manuscript drafting. Janice P. Lea: conception, design, interpretation of data, and manuscript drafting. Harold A. Franch: conception, design, analysis, interpretation of data, manuscript drafting, and manuscript revision.

The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare and have no financial disclosures.

Subject:

Research Funding:

No funding was received for this work.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Urology & Nephrology
  • COVID-19
  • Dialysis
  • Outcomes
  • HEMODIALYSIS-PATIENTS
  • OUTCOMES

Epidemiology of COVID-19 Infection in Hospitalized End-Stage Kidney Disease Patients in a Predominantly African-American Population

Tools:

Journal Title:

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF NEPHROLOGY

Volume:

Volume 52, Number 3

Publisher:

, Pages 190-198

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Background: End-stage kidney disease patients on dialysis are particularly susceptible to COVID-19 infection due to comorbidities, age, and logistic constraints of dialysis making social distancing difficult. We describe our experience with hospitalized dialysis patients with COVID-19 and factors associated with mortality. Methods: From March 1, 2020, to May 31, 2020, all dialysis patients admitted to 4 Emory Hospitals and tested for COVID-19 were identified. Sociodemographic information and clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical record. Death was defined as an in-hospital death or transfer to hospice for end-of-life care. Patients were followed until discharge or death. Results: Sixty-four dialysis patients with COVID-19 were identified. Eighty-four percent were African-American. The median age was 64 years, and 59% were males. Four patients were on peritoneal dialysis, and 60 were on hemodialysis for a median time of 3.8 years, while 31% were obese. Fever (72%), cough (61%), and diarrhea (22%) were the most common symptoms at presentation. Thirty-three percent required admission to intensive care unit, and 23% required mechanical ventilation. The median length of stay was 10 days, while 11 patients (17%) died during hospitalization and 17% were discharged to a temporary rehabilitation facility. Age >65 years (RR 13.7, CI: 1.9-100.7), C-reactive protein >100 mg/dL (RR 8.3, CI: 1.1-60.4), peak D-dimer >3,000 ng/mL (RR 4.3, CI: 1.03-18.2), bilirubin >1 mg/dL (RR 3.9, CI: 1.5-10.4), and history of peripheral vascular disease (RR 3.2, CI: 1.2-9.1) were associated with mortality. Dialysis COVID-19-infected patients were more likely to develop thromboembolic complications than those without COVID-19 (RR 3.7, CI: 1.3-10.1). Conclusion: In a predominantly African-American population, the mortality of end-stage kidney disease patients admitted with COVID-19 infection was 17%. Age, C-reactive protein, D-dimer, bilirubin, and history of peripheral vascular disease were associated with worse survival.

Copyright information:

© 2021 by S. Karger AG, Basel

Export to EndNote