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Author Notes:

Anne M. Fitzpatrick, Ph.D., 2015 Uppergate Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, Telephone: 404-727-9112, Facsimile: 404-712-0920, Email: anne.fitzpatrick@emory.edu

Sheel N. Shah, Jocelyn R. Grunwell, Ahmad F. Mohammad, Susan T. Stephenson, Gerald B. Lee, and Anne M. Fitzpatrick have nothing to disclose.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This study was supported in part by: R01NR013700, R01NR018666, K24NR018866, and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378

B. P. Vickery receives grant support to his institution from the National Institutes of Health and Food Allergy Research & Education; is a consultant/advisor for Aimmune Therapeutics, AllerGenis, LLC, Food Allergy Research & Education, and Reacta Biosciences; and clinical investigator for Aimmune, DBV Technologies, Genentech, and Regeneron.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Asthma in children
  • Eosinophils
  • Exacerbation
  • Type 2 inflammation
  • EXHALED NITRIC-OXIDE
  • INNER-CITY CHILDREN
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • PERSISTENT ASTHMA
  • CHILDHOOD ASTHMA
  • ACUTE EXACERBATION
  • SERUM
  • BLOOD
  • INFLAMMATION
  • MARKERS

Performance of Eosinophil Cationic Protein as a Biomarker in Asthmatic Children

Tools:

Journal Title:

JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY-IN PRACTICE

Volume:

Volume 9, Number 7

Publisher:

, Pages 2761-+

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Background: Although blood eosinophils are a frequently used marker of type 2 inflammation in children with asthma, their sensitivity is relatively poor. Additional markers of type 2 inflammation are needed. Objective: We hypothesized that plasma concentrations of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), a marker of eosinophil activation, would be useful for detection of type 2 inflammation and would predict poorer asthma outcomes over 1 year. Methods: Children and adolescents 6 through 17 years (N = 256) with confirmed asthma completed a baseline visit and a follow-up visit at 12 months. A subset also underwent systemic corticosteroid responsiveness testing with intramuscular triamcinolone. Outcome measures at 12 months included uncontrolled asthma, lung function, and asthma exacerbations treated with systemic corticosteroids. Results: Plasma ECP concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 413.61 ng/mL (median, 6.95 ng/mL) and were consistently associated with other markers of type 2 inflammation. At baseline, children in the highest ECP tertile had poorer asthma control, more airflow limitation, and more exacerbations, but also had greater symptom improvement with intramuscular triamcinolone. At 12 months, associations between the highest ECP tertile and exacerbations, but not lung function or asthma control, persisted after covariate adjustment. However, the sensitivity of ECP was modest and was not markedly different from that of blood eosinophil counts. Conclusion: Plasma ECP concentrations may be a useful marker of type 2 inflammation in children and may help identify those children at highest risk for recurrent exacerbations who could benefit from corticosteroid treatment. However, additional markers may be needed to improve sensitivity for outcome detection.

Copyright information:

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/rdf).
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