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Author Notes:

Roberto Pacifici

roberto.pacifici@emory.edu

No competing interests declared.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This paper was supported by the following grants: National Institutes of Health DK112946 to Roberto Pacifici. National Institutes of Health DK108842 to Roberto Pacifici. National Institutes of Health RR028009 to Roberto Pacifici. National Institutes of Health DK098391 to Rheinallt M Jones.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Biology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics
  • SEGMENTED FILAMENTOUS BACTERIA
  • BONE-FORMATION
  • TH17 CELLS
  • DIVERSITY
  • SEQUENCES
  • DIFFERENTIATION
  • INTERLEUKIN-17
  • INDUCTION
  • MICE

The gut microbiota is a transmissible determinant of skeletal maturation

Tools:

Journal Title:

ELIFE

Volume:

Volume 10

Publisher:

, Pages 1-21

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Genetic factors account for the majority of the variance of human bone mass, but the contribution of non-genetic factors remains largely unknown. By utilizing maternal/offspring transmission, cohabitation, or fecal material transplantation (FMT) studies, we investigated the influence of the gut microbiome on skeletal maturation. We show that the gut microbiome is a communicable regulator of bone structure and turnover in mice. In addition, we found that the acquisition of a specific bacterial strain, segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB), a gut microbe that induces intestinal Th17 cell expansion, was sufficient to negatively impact skeletal maturation. These findings have significant translational implications, as the identification of methods or timing of microbiome transfer may lead to the development of bacteriotherapeutic interventions to optimize skeletal maturation in humans. Moreover, the transfer of SFB-like microbes capable of triggering the expansion of human Th17 cells during therapeutic FMT procedures could lead to significant bone loss in fecal material recipients.

Copyright information:

© 2021, Tyagi et al.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/rdf).
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