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Author Notes:

susan.margulies@emory.edu

Both authors made substantial contributions to the paper and contributed to the conception and design, and interpretation of data. RAO ran the experiments, collected and analysed the data. RAO and SSM interpreted the data. Manuscript draft and revisions were completed by both RAO and SSM. Both authors read and approved the final manuscript.

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

The research was supported by a grant awarded to SSM by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Grant Number: R01NS097549 and the Georgia Research Alliance. The grant supported the necessary funds for acquiring study animals and salaries for veterinary personnel and support staff for data collection and analysis. The sponsors were not involved in the design, methods, data collection, analysis, or preparation of this paper.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Auditory oddball paradigm
  • EEG
  • Event-related potential
  • Porcine
  • TRAUMATIC BRAIN-INJURY
  • ANIMAL-MODELS
  • MISMATCH NEGATIVITY
  • CHILDREN
  • POTENTIALS
  • NEUROPATHOLOGY
  • SCHIZOPHRENIA
  • IMPAIRMENT
  • CONCUSSION
  • DISABILITY

Target detection in healthy 4-week old piglets from a passive two-tone auditory oddball paradigm

Tools:

Journal Title:

BMC NEUROSCIENCE

Volume:

Volume 21, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 52-52

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Background: Passive auditory oddball tests are effort independent assessments that evaluate auditory processing and are suitable for paediatric patient groups. Our goal was to develop a two-tone auditory oddball test protocol and use this clinical assessment in an immature large animal model. Event-related potentials captured middle latency P1, N1, and P2 responses in 4-week old (N = 16, female) piglets using a custom piglet 32- electrode array on 3 non-consecutive days. The effect of target tone frequency (250 Hz and 4000 Hz) on middle latency responses were tested in a subset of animals. Results: Results show that infrequent target tone pulses elicit greater N1 amplitudes than frequent standard tone pulses. There was no effect of day. Electrodes covering the front of the head tend to elicit greater waveform responses. P2 amplitudes increased for higher frequency target tones (4000 Hz) than the regular 1000 Hz target tones (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Two-tone auditory oddball tests produced consistent responses day-to-day. This clinical assessment was successful in the immature large animal model.

Copyright information:

© The Author(s) 2020.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/rdf).
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