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Author Notes:

Thomas H Thatcher, Department of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, 1220 E Broad St, Box 980050, Richmond VA 23298, Thomas.thatcher@vcuhealth.org

All authors contributed to the study design and data analysis plan. THT, CFW, JT and AK performed the initial data analysis, which was then reviewed and commented on by all authors. THT and JT assembled the figures and tables. THT wrote the initial draft of the manuscript. All authors had the opportunity to comment on and revise the manuscript, and all authors approved the final version.

All authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported in part by The Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Inc. grant number HT9404–13-1–0030, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Grant # P30ES01247 and NIH training grant T32HL066988. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official positions of the Uniformed Services University, the U.S. Department of Defense, Clarkson University or the University of Rochester.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
  • burn pits
  • deployment
  • dioxins
  • exposure assessment
  • microRNA
  • POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS
  • HIGH-RESOLUTION METABOLOMICS
  • INCINERATOR OPERATIONS
  • MILITARY PERSONNEL
  • AIRBORNE DIOXINS
  • HEALTH OUTCOMES
  • BAGRAM AIRFIELD
  • MICRORNAS
  • EXPRESSION
  • DEPLOYMENT

Analysis of Postdeployment Serum Samples Identifies Potential Biomarkers of Exposure to Burn Pits and Other Environmental Hazards

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Journal Title:

JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE

Volume:

Volume 61, Number 12

Publisher:

, Pages S45-S54

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Objective:The potential health risks of deployment to sites with open burn pits remain poorly understood, in part, because personal exposure monitoring was not performed. Here, we investigated whether postdeployment serum samples contain biomarkers associated with exposure to burn pits.Methods:A total of 237 biomarkers were measured in 800 serum samples from deployed and never-deployed subjects. We used a regression model and a supervised vector machine to identify serum biomarkers with significant associations with exposures and deployment.Results:We identified 101 serum biomarkers associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, dioxins or furans, and 54 biomarkers associated with deployment. Twenty-six of these biomarkers were shared in common by the exposure and deployment groups.Conclusions:We identify a potential signature of exposure to open burn pits, and provide a framework for using postexposure sera to identify exposures when contemporaneous monitoring was inadequate.

Copyright information:

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/rdf).
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