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Author Notes:

Grant C. Lynde, MD, MBA, Emory University, Department of Anesthesiology, 5T, 1364 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30322. Address e-mail to glynde@emory.edu

Gaurav P. Patel, MD: This author helped design the process described and conceive, write, and edit the manuscript.

Jeremy S. Collins, MD, FRCA: This author helped design the process described, review and edit the manuscript.

Cinnamon L. Sullivan, MD: This author helped design the process described, review and edit the manuscript.

Bradford D. Winters, PhD, MD, FCCM: This author helped design the process described, review and edit the manuscript.

Aliaksei Pustavoitau, MD, MHS, FCCM: This author helped design the process described, review and edit the manuscript.

Susan S. Margulies, PhD: This author helped review and edit the manuscript.

Grant C. Lynde, MD, MBA: This author helped design the process described, perform the data collection and analysis, write and edit the manuscript.

The authors thank Andrew J. Patterson, MD, PhD, for his advice and support in the development of this article.

The authors also thank Sun Choi, MPH, and Addison Jones for their assistance in providing data for this article.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Coronavirus Disease 2019
  • endotracheal intubation
  • aerosol-generating procedure
  • viral transmission
  • personal protective equipment
  • protocol adherence
  • exposure
  • pandemic

Management of Coronavirus Disease 2019 Intubation Teams

Tools:

Journal Title:

A&a Practice

Volume:

Volume 14, Number 8

Publisher:

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Some patients infected with the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) require endotracheal intubation, an aerosol-generating procedure that is believed to result in viral transmission to personnel performing the procedure. Additionally, donning and doffing personal protective equipment can be time consuming. In particular, doffing requires strict protocol adherence to avoid exposure. We describe the Emory Healthcare intubation team approach during the COVID-19 pandemic. This structure resulted in only 1 team member testing positive for COVID-19 despite 253 patient intubations over a 6-week period with 153 anesthesia providers on service.

Copyright information:

© 2020 International Anesthesia Research Society

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