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Author Notes:

D. C. Avgousti, Human Biology Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Avenue North, Mail Stop, C1-015, Seattle, WA 98109, USA, Tel: +1-206-667-2755, avgousti@fredhutch.org

We thank members of the Avgousti, Ornelles, and Garnett-Benson laboratories for critical reading of the manuscript and helpful discussions. We apologize to those whose primary research papers could not be cited due to space constraints.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Research in the Avgousti laboratory is supported by start-up funds from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and grants from the National Institutes of Health to DCA (GM133441), to KLL (CA9657), to DAO (CA127621) and to CG-B (CA162235).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
  • Biophysics
  • Cell Biology
  • adenovirus
  • chromatin
  • E1A
  • epigenetics
  • histones
  • host-pathogen interactions
  • persistence
  • post-translational modifications
  • protein VII
  • TEMPLATE-ACTIVATING FACTOR
  • POLYMERASE-CHAIN-REACTION
  • CORE PROTEIN-VII
  • DNA METHYLATION
  • TUMOR-SUPPRESSOR
  • GENE-EXPRESSION
  • HISTONE ACETYLATION
  • E4ORF6 PROTEIN
  • EARLY REGION-4
  • NUCLEOPROTEIN CORES

Epigenetics and the dynamics of chromatin during adenovirus infections

Tools:

Journal Title:

FEBS LETTERS

Volume:

Volume 593, Number 24

Publisher:

, Pages 3551-3570

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

The DNA genome of eukaryotic cells is compacted by histone proteins within the nucleus to form chromatin. Nuclear-replicating viruses such as adenovirus have evolved mechanisms of chromatin manipulation to promote infection and subvert host defenses. Epigenetic factors may also regulate persistent adenovirus infection and reactivation in lymphoid tissues. In this review, we discuss the viral proteins E1A and protein VII that interact with and alter host chromatin, as well as E4orf3, which separates host chromatin from sites of viral replication. We also highlight recent advances in chromatin technologies that offer new insights into virus-directed chromatin manipulation. Beyond the role of chromatin in the viral replication cycle, we discuss the nature of persistent viral genomes in lymphoid tissue and cell lines, and the potential contribution of epigenetic signals in maintaining adenovirus in a quiescent state. By understanding the mechanisms through which adenovirus manipulates host chromatin, we will understand new aspects of this ubiquitous virus and shed light on previously unknown aspects of chromatin biology.

Copyright information:

© 2019 Federation of European Biochemical Societies

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