About this item:

45 Views | 38 Downloads

Author Notes:

The authors thank Jim Thomas for his contributions to the work described in Section IV.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

The research from the authors’ labs was supported by NIH MH062656 to J. L. G., by NIH 1R01MH082833-01, NIH 5R21MH082046-02, and NSF IOS-0723805 to D. L. M. and the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Genetics & Heredity
  • WHITE-THROATED SPARROW
  • MALE SONG SPARROWS
  • VASOACTIVE INTESTINAL POLYPEPTIDE
  • HISTORY TRADE-OFFS
  • MELOSPIZA-MELODIA
  • SOCIAL-BEHAVIOR
  • TERRITORIAL AGGRESSION
  • ZONOTRICHIA-ALBICOLLIS
  • PARENTAL BEHAVIOR
  • PASSER-DOMESTICUS

Neurogenomic Mechanisms of Aggression in Songbirds

Tools:

Journal Title:

AGGRESSION

Volume:

Volume 75

Publisher:

, Pages 83-119

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Our understanding of the biological basis of aggression in all vertebrates, including humans, has been built largely upon discoveries first made in birds. A voluminous literature now indicates that hormonal mechanisms are shared between humans and a number of avian species. Research on genetics mechanisms in birds has lagged behind the more typical laboratory species because the necessary tools have been lacking until recently. Over the past 30 years, three major technical advances have propelled forward our understanding of the hormonal, neural, and genetic bases of aggression in birds: (1) the development of assays to measure plasma levels of hormones in free-living individuals, or "field endocrinology"; (2) the immunohistochemical labeling of immediate early gene products to map neural responses to social stimuli; and (3) the sequencing of the zebra finch genome, which makes available a tremendous set of genomic tools for studying gene sequences, expression, and chromosomal structure in species for which we already have large datasets on aggressive behavior. This combination of hormonal, neuroendocrine, and genetic tools has established songbirds as powerful models for understanding the neural basis and evolution of aggression in vertebrates. In this chapter, we discuss the contributions of field endocrinology toward a theoretical framework linking aggression with sex steroids, explore evidence that the neural substrates of aggression are conserved across vertebrate species, and describe a promising new songbird model for studying the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying aggression.

Copyright information:

© 2011 Elsevier Inc.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Export to EndNote