About this item:

76 Views | 97 Downloads

Author Notes:

Correspondence: Katherine A. Yeager, RN, PhD, FAAN, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, 404-727-8627, kyeager@emory.edu

We are indebted to the individuals who participated in the study. We also want to thank the research staff that managed the recruitment of participants and data collection.

Disclosures: All authors report no potential conflicts of interest.

Research Funding:

This study was supported by the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Nursing Research, 1K01NR014673. REDCap is supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (NIH/NCATS UL1 TR000445)

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Health Care Sciences & Services
  • Medicine, General & Internal
  • Clinical Neurology
  • General & Internal Medicine
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Cancer pain
  • Black race
  • opioids
  • adherence
  • electronic monitoring
  • PERCEIVED SOCIAL SUPPORT
  • MEDICATION ADHERENCE
  • MULTIDIMENSIONAL SCALE
  • ONCOLOGY OUTPATIENTS
  • ANALGESIC ADHERENCE
  • AFRICAN-AMERICANS
  • VALIDATION
  • PREDICTORS
  • MANAGEMENT
  • SYMPTOMS

Factors Related to Adherence to Opioids in Black Patients With Cancer Pain

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

Volume:

Volume 57, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 28-36

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Context: Cancer pain relief is often inadequate because of poor adherence to pain medication, especially for black patients. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to describe factors related to adherence to around-the-clock opioids among 110 black patients being treated for cancer pain. Methods: Sociodemographic, clinical, symptoms, and social support data were collected at baseline; pain and adherence data were collected at 30 days. Associations between these variables and opioid adherence measured by Medication Event Monitoring System were estimated using multiple regression. Results: Mean age was 56 (±10.1), the majority were women (63%) and college educated (56%). Mean pain severity at baseline equaled 4.6 (±2.3). Mean dose adherence was 60% (±28.5), while mean schedule adherence was 33.0% (±31.0). In adjusted analysis, 26% of the variance in dose adherence was explained by recent chemotherapy, changes in pain, concerns about nausea, and doctors’ focus on cure versus pain control (P<0.001); 27% of the variance in schedule adherence was explained by recent chemotherapy, changes in pain, symptom burden, and concerns about doctors focus on cure versus pain control (P<0.001). Conclusion: Findings confirm pain medication adherence is poor and pain was not well relieved. Multiple factors influence adherence to around-the-clock opioids. Clinicians need to partner with patients by providing a personalized pain treatment plan including an in-depth assessment of treatment choices and adherence.

Copyright information:

© 2018 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Export to EndNote