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Author Notes:

Kathryn M. Yount,Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, 1518 Clifton Rd, NE, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA, kyount@emory.edu.

We thank the International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh for making the data available for secondary analysis.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

A research grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Institute for Child Health and Development (1 R03 HD081438-01A1 PI Kathryn Yount) supported this work.

The United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA GR-00799) supported the original data collection.

Keywords:

  • Social Sciences
  • Psychology, Social
  • Psychology
  • depression
  • multilevel analysis
  • gender role strain
  • economic strain
  • men's mental health
  • GENERAL STRAIN THEORY
  • INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE
  • ROLE CONFLICT SCALE
  • FINANCIAL STRAIN
  • CHILDHOOD TRAUMA
  • NORMS INVENTORY
  • GENDER
  • HEALTH
  • MASCULINITY
  • POVERTY

Multilevel Influences on Depressive Symptoms Among Men in Bangladesh

Tools:

Journal Title:

Psychology of Men and Masculinity

Volume:

Volume 20, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 104-114

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Depression is a worldwide problem and is especially prevalent in lower income countries with insufficient resources and widespread poverty, such as Bangladesh. Yet, multilevel determinants of depressive symptoms in men have not been studied in this context. We leverage a novel data set from men in Bangladesh to determine the community- and individual-level influences of masculine dominance strain and financial strain on the frequency of married men's depressive symptoms in Bangladesh. Data were collected between January and June 2011 as part of the United Nations Multi-Country Study on Men and Violence, conducted by the International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh. Masculine dominance strain at both levels was related to the frequency of depressive symptoms. Financial strain only at the individual level was related to the frequency of depressive symptoms. We conclude that community-level economic interventions may not directly influence individual-level depression; however, addressing customary conceptions of masculinity at the community and individual levels and addressing individual-level financial strain are promising joint strategies to improve married men's mental health in Bangladesh and similar settings.

Copyright information:

© 2018 American Psychological Association.

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