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Author Notes:

John Petros, Department of Urology, Emory University, 1365 Clifton Rd Building B, Rm. 4206, Atlanta, GA 30322, Georgia, jpetros@emory.edu

We thank Dr. Thomas Ganz; Dr. Erika V. Valore; Dr. Lily Yang; Dr. Guan-Zhe Wu, and Dr. Jack Arbiser for the generous gifts of hBD-1 antibody, BT474 breast cancer cells, TSU-Pr1 bladder cancer cells, nickel sulfate compound, and unlimited technical support.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by the Emory University Urology Department and the Medical Research Council, UK.

This study was supported by JRD funded by Medical Research Council UK.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Oncology
  • Host defense
  • human defensins
  • tumor inhibitors
  • tumor therapeutics
  • tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs)
  • bladder cancer
  • gene expression
  • HER2
  • DENDRITIC CELLS
  • ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDE
  • SUPPRESSOR-CELLS
  • POTENTIAL ROLE
  • MYELOID CELLS
  • BETA
  • MACROPHAGES
  • EXPRESSION
  • VIRUS
  • MODULATION

Discovery and mechanisms of host defense to oncogenesis: targeting the beta-defensin-1 peptide as a natural tumor inhibitor

Tools:

Journal Title:

Cancer Biology and Therapy

Volume:

Volume 20, Number 6

Publisher:

, Pages 774-786

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Human beta-defensin-1 (hBD-1) is one of a number of small cationic host-defense peptides. Besides its well-known broad-spectrum antimicrobial function, hBD-1 has recently been identified as a chromosome 8p tumor-suppressor gene. The role of hBD-1 in modulating the host immune response to oncogenesis, associated with cell signaling and potential therapeutic applications, has become increasingly appreciated over time. In this study, multiple approaches were used to illustrate hBD-1 anti-tumor activities. Results demonstrate that hBD-1 peptide alters human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) signal transduction and represses retroviral-mediated transgene expression in cancer cells. Loss of orthologous murine defense-1 (mBD1) in mice enhances nickel sulfate-induced leiomyosarcoma and causes mouse kidney cells to exhibit increased susceptibility to HPV-16 E6/7-induced neoplastic transformation. Furthermore, for the first time, a novel function of the urine-derived hBD-1 peptide was discovered to suppress bladder cancer growth and this may lead to future applications in the treatment of malignancy.

Copyright information:

© 2019 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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