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Author Notes:

Corresponding author: Martin O Job, Yerkes National Primate Research Center of Emory University, 954 Gatewood Rd NE, Atlanta GA 30329, USA, mjob@emory.edu, Phone – (713) 443 0062, FAX – (404) 727 3278

Subject:

Research Funding:

This project was funded by the National Center for Research Resources P51RR165 and is currently supported by the Office of Research Infrastructure Programs/OD P51OD11132.

It was also supported by DA 015040, DA 15162 and the Georgia Research Alliance.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • CART peptide
  • CART 55-102
  • Cocaine
  • Acute
  • Chronic
  • RAT NUCLEUS-ACCUMBENS
  • REGULATED TRANSCRIPT PEPTIDE
  • DOPAMINE-RECEPTORS
  • MESSENGER-RNA
  • BODY-WEIGHT
  • EXPRESSION
  • AMPHETAMINE
  • D1
  • INCREASES
  • INJECTION

The inhibition of cocaine-induced locomotor activity by CART 55-102 is lost after repeated cocaine administration

Tools:

Journal Title:

Neuroscience Letters

Volume:

Volume 550

Publisher:

, Pages 179-183

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

CART peptide is known for having an inhibitory effect on cocaine- and dopamine-mediated actions after acute administration of cocaine and dopamine. In this regard, it is postulated to be a homeostatic, regulatory factor on dopaminergic activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, there is no data on the effect of CART peptide after chronic administration of cocaine, and this study addresses this. It was found that CART peptide blunted cocaine-induced locomotion (LMA) after acute administration of cocaine, as expected, but it did not affect cocaine-mediated LMA after chronic administration of cocaine. The loss of CART peptide's inhibitory effect did not return for up to 9 weeks after stopping the repeated cocaine administration. It may not be surprising that homeostatic regulatory mechanisms in the NAc are lost after repeated cocaine administration, and that this may be a mechanism in the development of addiction.

Copyright information:

© 2013 The Authors.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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