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Author Notes:

Matthew C. Freeman, 1518 Clifton Rd. NE CNR 2027, Atlanta, GA 30322. E-mail: mcfreem@emory.edu

We are indebted to the staffs of CARE - Kenya; Great Lakes University of Kisumu; Water.org; and the Kenya Water and Health Organization for their diligent efforts in Kenya.

Lily Lukorito played a considerable role in stool sampling.

We acknowledge the work of Dr. Alfred Luoba who passed away before the completion of the project.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

The project was funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and led by CARE – USA.

SJB is supported by a Wellcome Trust Senior Fellowship in Basic Biomedical Science (098045).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
  • Tropical Medicine
  • POOR URBAN AREAS
  • ASCARIS-LUMBRICOIDES
  • ALBENDAZOLE TREATMENT
  • HOOKWORM INFECTION
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • CHILDREN
  • CHEMOTHERAPY
  • PATTERNS
  • EFFICACY
  • EPIDEMIOLOGY

The Impact of a School-Based Hygiene, Water Quality and Sanitation Intervention on Soil-Transmitted Helminth Reinfection: A Cluster-Randomized Trial

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Journal Title:

American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

Volume:

Volume 89, Number 5

Publisher:

, Pages 875-883

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

We conducted a cluster-randomized trial to assess the impact of a school-based water treatment, hygiene, and sanitation program on reducing infection with soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) after school-based deworming. We assessed infection with STHs at baseline and then at two follow-up rounds 8 and 10 months after deworming. Forty government primary schools in Nyanza Province, Kenya were randomly selected and assigned to intervention or control arms. The intervention reduced reinfection prevalence (odds ratio [OR] 0.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.31-1.00) and egg count (rate ratio [RR] 0.34, CI 0.15-0.75) of Ascaris lumbricoides. We found no evidence of significant intervention effects on the overall prevalence and intensity of Trichuris trichiura, hookworm, or Schistosoma mansoni reinfection. Provision of school-based sanitation, water quality, and hygiene improvements may reduce reinfection of STHs after school-based deworming, but the magnitude of the effects may be sex- and helminth species-specific.

Copyright information:

Copyright © 2013 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

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