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Author Notes:

E-mail Address: medmrd@emory.edu

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

The preparation of this article was supported through grants from the NIH/NINDS (R01-NS054976, R01-NS071074 and P50-NS071669 (TW)), and by NIH/NCRR grant RR-000165 (Yerkes National Primate Center).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Multidisciplinary Sciences
  • Neurosciences
  • Science & Technology - Other Topics
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Parkinson's disease
  • dystonia
  • subthalamic nucleus
  • internal pallidal segment
  • pedunculopontine nucleus
  • segregated circuits
  • SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS STIMULATION
  • MOTOR CORTEX EXCITABILITY
  • PARKINSONS-DISEASE
  • BASAL GANGLIA
  • PEDUNCULOPONTINE NUCLEUS
  • BETA OSCILLATIONS
  • CEREBELLUM
  • DYSTONIA
  • CIRCUITS
  • AREA

Deep brain stimulation for movement and other neurologic disorders

Tools:

Journal Title:

Brain stimulation in neurology and psychiatry

Volume:

Volume 1265, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 1-8

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was introduced as a treatment for patients with parkinsonism and other movement disorders in the early 1990s. The technique rapidly became the treatment of choice for these conditions, and is now also being explored for other diseases, including Tourette syndrome, gait disorders, epilepsy, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and depression. Although the mechanism of action of DBS remains unclear, it is recognized that DBS works through focal modulation of functionally specific circuits. The fact that the same DBS parameters and targets can be used in multiple diseases suggests that DBS does not counteract the pathophysiology of any specific disorder, but acts to replace pathologic activities in disease-affected brain circuits with activity that is more easily tolerated. Despite the progress made in the use of DBS, much remains to be done to fully realize the potential of this therapy. We describe some of the most active areas of research in this field, both in terms of exploration of new targets and stimulation parameters, and in terms of new electrode or stimulator designs.

Copyright information:

© 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

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