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Author Notes:

Corresponding author Dr. Sandra B. Dunbar, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, 1520 Clifton Rd, NE, Atlanta, GA 30322 (sbdunba@emory.edu); 404-727-6939 PHONE; (404) 727-9382 FAX

Contributor Information Kenya D. Kirkendoll, Senior Research Nurse, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA. Currently, Clinical Instructor, Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA. Patricia C. Clark, Associate Professor, Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA. Daurice A. Grossniklaus, Doctoral student, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA. Priscilla Igho-Pemu, Director of Clinical Trials, Clinical Research Center and Assistant Professor of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Rebecca M. Mullis, Professor and Department Head, College of Family and Consumer Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA. Sandra B. Dunbar, Charles Howard Candler Professor, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.

Acknowledgments The authors thank the staff in the META-Health project, the Emory General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) and the Morehouse Clinical Research Center for their important contributions.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was partially supported by funding from National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH (1 U01 HL079156-01) (Dr. Quyyumi, PI) and PHS Grant M01-RR00039 from the Emory General Clinical Research Center, NIH, National Center for Health Resources and PHS Grant UL1 RR025008 from the Clinical and Translational Science Award program, NIH, NCRR and Grant 5P20RR11104 from the (NIH), National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) for the Morehouse Clinical Research Center.

Keywords:

  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Focus groups
  • Physical activity
  • Behavioral change
  • African American

Metabolic Syndrome in African Americans: Views on Making Lifestyle Changes

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of Transcultural Nursing

Volume:

Volume 21, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages 104-113

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

This study explores African American adults’ understanding of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and their motivations for making lifestyle changes. African Americans have a greater risk for components of MetS, such as hypertension.Methods Three focus groups were conducted with African American adults (n=11) with MetS. Findings Content analysis revealed themes of: Threat of Poor Health, Building Trust with Providers, Gaining Social Support; Seeking Culturally Acceptable Alternatives; and Getting on Track and Staying on Track. Conclusions Lifestyle interventions for African Americans with MetS need to focus on building trust, developing self-monitoring skills, social support, and identifying low cost/convenient opportunities for physical activity.

Copyright information:

© 2010, © SAGE Publications

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