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Author Notes:

Reprint requests: Costas G. Hadjipanayis, MD, PhD, Department of Neurosurgery, Emory University School of Medicine, 1365-B Clifton Road, Suite 6200, Atlanta, GA 30322. chadjip@emory.edu

Contributor Information Costas G. Hadjipanayis, Department of Neurosurgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Albert J. Schuette, Department of Neurosurgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Nicholas Boulis, Department of Neurosurgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Charlie Hao, Department of Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

Daniel L. Barrow, Department of Neurosurgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Charles Teo, Centre for Minimally Invasive, Neurosurgery, Prince of Wales Hospital, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Disclosure The authors have no personal financial or institutional interest in any of the drugs, materials, or devices described in this article.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke : NINDS

Keywords:

  • Colloid cyst
  • Endoscopic third ventriculostomy
  • Neuroendoscopy
  • Ventriculoperitoneal shunt

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Tools:

Journal Title:

Neurosurgery

Volume:

Volume 67, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 197-204

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE The purpose of Clinical Problem Solving articles is to present management challenges to give practicing neurosurgeons insight into how field leaders address these dilemmas. This illustration is accompanied by a brief review of the literature on the topic. PRESENTATION The case of a 16-year-old boy presenting with headaches is presented. The patient is found to have a typical colloid cyst at the foramen of Monro. Bilateral ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement had been performed as an initial treatment of the patient before presentation. RESULTS Surgeons experienced in open and endoscopic surgery discuss their individual approaches to colloid cysts, in the context of previous shunting, providing a varied perspective on the clinical challenges posed by these lesions. CONCLUSION Both open and endoscopic options remain viable for excision of a colloid cyst. Each has associated potential complications, as illustrated by the current case.

Copyright information:

© 2010, Oxford University Press

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