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Author Notes:

Corresponding author Sandra B. Dunbar, RN, DSN, FAAN, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, 1520 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30322 (Sbdunba@emory.edu)

Contributor Information Sandra B. Dunbar, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. Patricia C. Clark, Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing, Georgia State University, Atlanta.

Christina Quinn, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. Rebecca A. Gary, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Nadine J. Kaslow, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This manuscript was partially supported by NINR R01 8800, A Family Partnership Intervention in Heart Failure and PHS Grant M01-RR00039, EmoryGeneral Clinical Research Center, NIH, adn NIH, NMR 732 NR009888 Symptom Management: Heart Failure patient’s and family caregivers.

Keywords:

  • caregiver outcomes
  • family functioning
  • family support
  • heart failure
  • patient education
  • self-care
  • self-management

Family Influences on Heart Failure Self-care and Outcomes

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing

Volume:

Volume 23, Number 3

Publisher:

, Pages 258-265

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Many patient education guidelines for teaching heart failure patients recommend inclusion of the family; however, family-focused interventions to promote self-care in heart failure are few. This article reviews the state of the science regarding family influences on heart failure self-care and outcomes. The literature and current studies suggest that family functioning, family support, problem solving, communication, self-efficacy, and caregiver burden are important areas to target for future research. In addition, heart failure patients without family and those who live alone and are socially isolated are highly vulnerable for poor self-care and should receive focused attention. Specific research questions based on existing science and gaps that need to be filled to support clinical practice are posed.

Copyright information:

© 2008, © 2008 Lippincott Williams

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