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Author Notes:

Correspondence to Fadi Nahab, MD, 1001 Garden View Drive NE #711, Atlanta, GA 30319. Email: fnahab@emory.edu.

Statistical analyses completed by George Cotsonis, MS, and Michael Lynn, MS, Department of Biostatistics, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta.

S.C. has received personal compensation for activities with Boehringer-Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Bristol Myers Squibb/Sanofi and Pfizer.

J.C.H. has received personal compensation for activities with Innercool Therapies.

K.J. has received personal compensation for activities with Boehringer-Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Sanofi-Aventis Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Ono Pharmaceuticals, Astra-Zeneca Pharmaceuticals and NIH/NINDS.

S.E.K. reports having received consulting fees from Boehringer-Ingelheim and the Sankyo/Lilly Partnership; and lecture fees from Boehringer-Ingelheim and Bristol-Myers Squibb; all corporate affiliations are with companies that make antithrombotic agents not evaluated in this study.

M.I.C. reports being paid fees by the Bristol-Myers Squibb/Sanofi Pharmaceuticals Partnership, Astra-Zeneca, and the Sankyo Lilly Partnership for consulting on antithrombotic agents that were not evaluated in this trial, and from Guidant Corporation for consulting on a medical device (an intracranial stent) that was not evaluated in this trial.

The other authors have nothing to disclose.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

M.L. reports receiving grant support from NINDS and the National Eye Institute (grant U 10EY013287).

E.F. is funded by a research grant (1 RO1 NS 39131–04) from the US Public Health Service National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).

S.C. has received financial support from Boehringer-Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Suntory and Pfizer.

J.C.H. has received research support from NIH/NINDS.

S.E.K. reports having received grant support from NINDS and Boehringer-Ingelheim.

M.I.C. is the recipient of a research grant (1R01 NS36643) from the US Public Health Service National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) to fund this trial. He is also supported by grant 1 K24 NS050307 from the NIH/NINDS.

Keywords:

  • atherosclerosis
  • diabetes
  • intracranial disease
  • intracranial stenosis
  • prognosis
  • risk factors
  • stroke

Prevalence and Prognosis of Coexistent Asymptomatic Intracranial Stenosis

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Journal Title:

Stroke

Volume:

Volume 39, Number 3

Publisher:

, Pages 1039-1041

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Background and Purpose There are limited data on the prevalence and prognosis of asymptomatic intracranial stenosis (AIS). Methods Baseline cerebral angiograms and MR angiograms were used to determine AIS (50% to 99%) coexistent to symptomatic intracranial stenosis for patients enrolled in the Warfarin-Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease study. Results Coexisting AIS were detected in 18.9% (n=14/74) of patients undergoing 4-vessel cerebral angiography and 27.3% (n=65/238) of patients undergoing MR angiogram. During a mean follow-up period of 1.8 years, no ischemic strokes were attributable to an AIS on cerebral angiography and 5 ischemic strokes (5.9%, 95% CI: 2.1% to 12.3%) occurred in the AIS territory on MR angiogram (risk at 1 year=3.5%, 95% CI: 0.8% to 9.0%). Conclusions Whereas the prevalence of coexisting AIS (50% to 99%) in patients with symptomatic stenosis is high, the risk of stroke from these asymptomatic stenoses is low.

Copyright information:

© 2008 American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved.

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