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Author Notes:

Shella Keilholz, 101 Woodruff Circle WMB 2001, Atlanta, GA 30322; Phone: 404-727-2433; Fax: 404-727-9873; shella.keilholz@bme.gatech.edu

Subjects:

Research Funding:

NIH; 1R21NS072810-01A1 and 1R21NS057718-01

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neuroimaging
  • Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • MONKEY VISUAL-CORTEX
  • FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY
  • SPONTANEOUS FLUCTUATIONS
  • SPATIOTEMPORAL DYNAMICS
  • HEMODYNAMIC SIGNALS
  • CEREBRAL-CORTEX
  • BRAIN ACTIVITY
  • IN-VIVO
  • POTENTIALS
  • NETWORKS

Infraslow LFP correlates to resting-state fMRI BOLD signals

Tools:

Journal Title:

NeuroImage

Volume:

Volume 74

Publisher:

, Pages 288-297

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

The slow fluctuations of the blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal in resting-state fMRI are widely utilized as a surrogate marker of ongoing neural activity. Spontaneous neural activity includes a broad range of frequencies, from infraslow (< 0.5. Hz) fluctuations to fast action potentials. Recent studies have demonstrated a correlative relationship between the BOLD fluctuations and power modulations of the local field potential (LFP), particularly in the gamma band. However, the relationship between the BOLD signal and the infraslow components of the LFP, which are directly comparable in frequency to the BOLD fluctuations, has not been directly investigated. Here we report a first examination of the temporal relation between the resting-state BOLD signal and infraslow LFPs using simultaneous fMRI and full-band LFP recording in rat. The spontaneous BOLD signal at the recording sites exhibited significant localized correlation with the infraslow LFP signals as well as with the slow power modulations of higher-frequency LFPs (1-100. Hz) at a delay comparable to the hemodynamic response time under anesthesia. Infraslow electrical activity has been postulated to play a role in attentional processes, and the findings reported here suggest that infraslow LFP coordination may share a mechanism with the large-scale BOLD-based networks previously implicated in task performance, providing new insight into the mechanisms contributing to the resting state fMRI signal.

Copyright information:

© 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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