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Author Notes:

Corresponding Author. Leopoldo J. Cabassa, School of Social Work, Columbia University, 1255 Amsterdam, New York, NY 10027. Tel: 212-851-22725. Fax: 212-851-2204 ljc2139@columbia.edu.

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Health Care Sciences & Services
  • Health Policy & Services
  • Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
  • multiple chronic medical conditions
  • mental disorders
  • health disparities
  • National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Condition
  • health services research
  • ALCOHOL-USE-DISORDER
  • NATIONAL EPIDEMIOLOGIC SURVEY
  • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • INTERVIEW SCHEDULE AUDADIS
  • SERIOUS MENTAL-ILLNESS
  • UNITED-STATES
  • CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
  • HEALTH-CARE
  • DIABETES-MELLITUS
  • RISK-FACTORS

Do Race, Ethnicity, and Psychiatric Diagnoses Matter in the Prevalence of Multiple Chronic Medical Conditions?

Tools:

Journal Title:

Medical Care

Volume:

Volume 51, Number 6

Publisher:

, Pages 540-547

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Background: The proportion of people in the United States with multiple chronic medical conditions (MCMC) is increasing. Yet, little is known about the relationship that race, ethnicity, and psychiatric disorders have on the prevalence of MCMCs in the general population. Methods: This study used data from wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (N = 33,107). Multinomial logistic regression models adjusting for sociodemographic variables, body mass index, and quality of life were used to examine differences in the 12-month prevalence of MCMC by race/ ethnicity, psychiatric diagnosis, and the interactions between race/ ethnicity and psychiatric diagnosis. Results: Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, Hispanics reported lower odds of MCMC and African Americans reported higher odds of MCMC after adjusting for covariates. People with psychiatric disorders reported higher odds of MCMC compared with people without psychiatric disorders. There were significant interactions between race and psychiatric diagnosis associated with rates of MCMC. In the presence of certain psychiatric disorders, the odds of MCMC were higher among African Americans with psychiatric disorders compared to non-Hispanic Whites with similar psychiatric disorders. Conclusions: Our study results indicate that race, ethnicity, and psychiatric disorders are associated with the prevalence of MCMC. As the rates of MCMC rise, it is critical to identify which populations are at increased risk and how to best direct services to address their health care needs.

Copyright information:

© 2013 by Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

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