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Author Notes:

Correspondence to Andreas P. Kalogeropoulos, MD, PhD Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute 1462 Clifton Rd NE, Suite 535B, Atlanta GA 30322 404-778-3652 office; 404-727-6495 fax akaloge@emory.edu

Disclosures: None.

Subject:

Research Funding:

This work has been partially supported by (1) the Emory University Research Committee and the Atlanta Clinical & Translational Science Institute (PHS Grant UL1 RR025008 from the Clinical and Translational Science Award program, National Institutes of Health, National Center for Research Resources) and (2) an American Heart Association Scientist Development Grant (13SDG15960001)

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems
  • Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging
  • Cardiovascular System & Cardiology
  • heart-assist devices
  • ventricular-assist device
  • echocardiography
  • decision support techniques
  • right ventricle
  • heart failure
  • MECHANICAL CIRCULATORY SUPPORT
  • ADVANCED HEART-FAILURE
  • FIXED PULMONARY-HYPERTENSION
  • PATIENT SELECTION
  • DIAMETER RATIO
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • IMPLANTATION
  • ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY
  • PREDICTORS
  • RECIPIENTS

Assessment of Right Ventricular Function in Left Ventricular Assist Device Candidates

Tools:

Journal Title:

Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging

Volume:

Volume 7, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages 379-389

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

As a result of the improved survival of patients with heart failure (HF) and the overall rise in the prevalence of HF,1 the number of patients in advanced (stage D) HF continues to increase, thus exceeding the limited availability of donor organs by a wide margin.2 Initially used primarily as a bridge to heart transplantation, mechanical circulatory support is now increasingly offered as a destination therapy to patients with advanced HF in clinical deterioration who are not candidates for transplantation. Improvement in survival to 80% at 1-year postimplantation3 has steadily followed the development of new technologies such as the continuous-flow pump, which now encompasses 99% of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs),3 and improvements in patient and device management. Far from being a panacea, mechanical circulatory support is still fraught with challenges. Among them, post-LVAD right ventricular failure (RVF) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality.

Copyright information:

© 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

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