About this item:

24 Views | 4 Downloads

Author Notes:

Correspondence Donald L. Bliwise, Ph.D. Department of Neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, 1841 Clifton Road, Room 509, Atlanta, Georgia 30329, USA, 404-728-4751 (phone)

Subject:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Sleep questionnaire
  • Principal component analysis
  • Nocturia
  • Sleep disordered breathing
  • Dreaming
  • Restless legs syndrome
  • Neurodegenerative disease
  • Parkinson's disease
  • RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME
  • BEHAVIOR DISORDER
  • PREVALENCE
  • NOCTURIA
  • SCALE
  • RISK
  • INSTRUMENT
  • SYMPTOMS
  • PATTERNS
  • APNEA

A Neurodegenerative Disease Sleep Questionnaire: Principal component analysis in Parkinson's disease

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of the Neurological Sciences

Volume:

Volume 336, Number 1-2

Publisher:

, Pages 243-246

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Sleep disturbances are common in many neurodegenerative diseases and may include altered sleep duration, fragmented sleep, nocturia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and vivid dreaming experiences, with occasional parasomnias. Although representing the "gold standard," polysomnography is not always cost-effective or available for measuring sleep disturbance, particularly for screening. Although numerous sleep-related questionnaires exist, many focus on a specific sleep disturbance (e.g., restless legs, REM Behavior Disorder) and do not capture efficiently the variety of sleep issues experienced by such patients. We administered the 12-item Neurodegenerative Disease Sleep Questionnaire (NDSQ) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale to 145 idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients. Principal component analysis using eigenvalues greater than 1 suggested five separate components: sleep quality (e.g., sleep fragmentation), nocturia, vivid dreams/nightmares, restless legs symptoms, and sleep-disordered breathing. These results demonstrate construct validity of our sleep questionnaire and suggest that the NDSQ may be a useful screening tool for sleep disturbances in at least some types of neurodegenerative disorders.

Copyright information:

© 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Creative Commons License

Export to EndNote