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Author Notes:

Xinfeng Liu, Department of Neurology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing 210002, China. Tel.: +86 25 84801861; fax: +86 25 84664563. xfliu2@vip.163.com.

Jieli Chen, Department of Neurology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202, USA. Tel.: +1 313 916 1991; fax: +1 313 916 1318. jieli@neuro.hfh.edu.

Authors declared no conflicts of interest.

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Research Funding:

This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China 31300900 (RY); 81300993 (TY); Jiangsu Provincial Special Program of Medical Science (BL2013025); National Institute on Aging of USA AG031811 (JC); and National Institute of Health of USA NS057255 (SPY); NS058710 (WL); and R41NS080329 (JC).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Stem cells
  • Cell-based therapies
  • Ischemic stroke
  • Neurorestoration
  • MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS
  • MARROW STROMAL CELLS
  • UMBILICAL-CORD BLOOD
  • FOCAL CEREBRAL-ISCHEMIA
  • NEURAL PROGENITOR CELLS
  • TISSUE-PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR
  • PROMOTE FUNCTIONAL RECOVERY
  • ARTERY OCCLUSION MODEL
  • ACUTE MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION
  • EXOSOME-MEDIATED TRANSFER

Cell based therapies for ischemic stroke: From basic science to bedside

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Journal Title:

Progress in Neurobiology

Volume:

Volume 115

Publisher:

, Pages 92-115

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Cell therapy is emerging as a viable therapy to restore neurological function after stroke. Many types of stem/progenitor cells from different sources have been explored for their feasibility and efficacy for the treatment of stroke. Transplanted cells not only have the potential to replace the lost circuitry, but also produce growth and trophic factors, or stimulate the release of such factors from host brain cells, thereby enhancing endogenous brain repair processes. Although stem/progenitor cells have shown a promising role in ischemic stroke in experimental studies as well as initial clinical pilot studies, cellular therapy is still at an early stage in humans. Many critical issues need to be addressed including the therapeutic time window, cell type selection, delivery route, and in vivo monitoring of their migration pattern. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive synopsis of preclinical evidence and clinical experience of various donor cell types, their restorative mechanisms, delivery routes, imaging strategies, future prospects and challenges for translating cell therapies as a neurorestorative regimen in clinical applications.

Copyright information:

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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