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Author Notes:

Jennifer L. Brown, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Texas Tech University, Box 42051, Lubbock, TX 79409-205, jennifer.brown@ttu.edu.

Jennifer L. Brown, Kelly S. DeMartini, Jessica M. Sales, and Andrea L. Swartzendruber declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ralph J. DiClemente is a consultant for the US Army and has received royalties from Jossey-Bass Publishers.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Jennifer L. Brown was supported by K12 GM000680 from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.

Kelly S. DeMartini was supported by T32 AA015496 from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

Andrea Swartzendruber was supported by F32AA022058 from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

Jessica M. Sales was supported by K01MH085506 from the National Institute of Mental Health.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Alcohol
  • Alcohol interventions
  • Behavioral aspects of HIV management
  • HIV
  • HIV-infected
  • HIV-positive
  • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • HEALTH-CARE UTILIZATION
  • SEXUAL RISK BEHAVIOR
  • MOTIVATIONAL ENHANCEMENT THERAPY
  • ACTIVE ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY
  • SUBSTANCE USE
  • HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY
  • CLINICAL-SIGNIFICANCE
  • MEDICATION ADHERENCE
  • SERVICES UTILIZATION

Interventions to Reduce Alcohol Use among HIV-Infected Individuals: A Review and Critique of the Literature

Tools:

Journal Title:

Current HIV/AIDS Reports

Volume:

Volume 10, Number 4

Publisher:

, Pages 356-370

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Alcohol use disorders are common among HIV-infected individuals and are associated with adverse physiological complications and increased engagement in other health risk behaviors. This paper provides a review and critique of interventions to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected individuals, including a: (a) synthesis of core intervention components and trial designs; (b) summary of intervention efficacy to reduce alcohol use outcomes; and (c) methodological critique and guidance for future research. We reviewed 14 behavioral interventions that reported on alcohol use outcomes among HIV-infected individuals. Findings were mixed for intervention efficacy to reduce alcohol frequency and quantity. There was limited evidence that interventions reduced binge drinking frequency or alcohol abuse or dependence symptoms. Despite the prevalence of disordered alcohol use among HIV-infected individuals, there is lack of efficacious intervention approaches. Efficacious intervention approaches to reduce alcohol use among HIV-infected individuals are urgently needed.

Copyright information:

© 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

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