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Author Notes:

Clinton D. Kilts, PhD, Psychiatry Research Institute, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham St, Mail Slot 554, Little Rock, AR 72205, CDKilts@uams.edu, Phone: (501) 526-8163, Fax: (501) 526-8199.

The authors also gratefully acknowledge the invaluable assistance and input to the project by the SATP clinical group leaders.

The authors report no conflicts of interest.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This project was supported by NIH grants R21DA025243 (Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Clinton Kilts); and F31DA025491 (Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Ashley Kennedy) from the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA); and the National Center for Research Resources grants UL RR025008 and TL1 RR025010 from the Atlanta Clinical and Translational Science Institute (ACTSI) (Emory University, Atlanta, GA).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Substance Abuse
  • RELAPSE FOLLOWING TREATMENT
  • EMOTIONAL STROOP TASK
  • BRAIN ACTIVATION
  • NEURAL BASIS
  • ALCOHOL
  • ADDICTION
  • PERFORMANCE
  • HEROIN
  • USERS
  • INTERFERENCE

Clinical Correlates of Attentional Bias to Drug Cues Associated with Cocaine Dependence

Tools:

Journal Title:

American Journal on Addictions

Volume:

Volume 23, Number 5

Publisher:

, Pages 478-484

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Background and Objective: Preoccupation (attentional bias) related to drug-related stimuli has been consistently observed for drug-dependent persons with several studies reporting an association of the magnitude of measured attentional bias with treatment outcomes. The major goal of the present study was to determine if pre-treatment attentional bias to personal drug use reminders in an addiction Stroop task predicts relapse in treatment-seeking, cocaine-dependent subjects. Methods: We sought to maximize the potential of attentional bias as a marker of risk for relapse by incorporating individualized rather than generalized drug use cues to reflect the personal conditioned associations that form the incentive motivation properties of drug cues in a sample of cocaine-dependent subjects (N = 35). Results: Although a significant group Stroop interference effect was present for drug versus neutral stimuli (ie, attentional bias), the level of attentional bias for cocaine-use words was not predictive of eventual relapse in this sample (d = .56). A similar lack of prediction power was observed for a non-drug counting word Stroop task as a significant interference effect was detected but did not predict relapse outcomes (d = .40). Conclusions and Scientific Significance: The results of the present study do not provide clear support for the predictive value of individual variation in drug-related attentional bias to forecast probability of relapse in cocaine-dependent men.

Copyright information:

© American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

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