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Author Notes:

Michael B. Himle, Department of Psychology, University of Utah, 380 S. 1530 E., Rm 502, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA., michael.himle@utah.edu.

The author(s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This research was supported by Grant R01MH070802 from the National Institute of Mental Health to the Tourette Syndrome Association, Inc. (PI: Dr. John Piacentini); with subcontracts to Drs. Douglas Woods, Larry Scahill, Sabine Wilhelm, Alan Peterson, and John Walkup.

Dr Scahill received support from the Yale University Clinical and Translational Sciences Award Grant UL1 RR024139 from the National Center for Research Resources, NIH.

Keywords:

  • Social Sciences
  • Psychology, Clinical
  • Psychology
  • Tourette disorder
  • chronic tic disorder
  • Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics
  • function-based assessment
  • TOURETTE-SYNDROME
  • DIFFERENTIAL REINFORCEMENT
  • FUNCTIONAL-ANALYSIS
  • BEHAVIOR-THERAPY
  • SEVERITY-SCALE
  • SUPPRESSION
  • SYMPTOMS
  • RELIABILITY
  • ADOLESCENTS
  • SCREEN

Variables Associated With Tic Exacerbation in Children With Chronic Tic Disorders

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Journal Title:

Behavior Modification

Volume:

Volume 38, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages 163-183

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Research has shown that motor and vocal tics fluctuate in frequency, intensity, and form in response to environmental and contextual cues. Behavioral models have proposed that some of the variation in tics may reflect context-dependent interactive learning processes such that once tics are performed, they are influenced by environmental contingencies. The current study describes the results of a function-based assessment of tics (FBAT) from a recently completed study comparing Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics (CBIT) with supportive psychotherapy. The current study describes the frequency with which antecedent and consequence variables were reported to exacerbate tics and the relationships between these functional variables and sample baseline characteristics, comorbidities, and measures of tic severity. Results showed that tic-exacerbating antecedents and consequences were nearly ubiquitous in a sample of children with chronic tic disorder. In addition, functional variables were related to baseline measures of comorbid internalizing symptoms and specific measures of tic severity.

Copyright information:

© The Author(s) 2014.

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