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Author Notes:

Candace D. McNaughton, MD, MPH, Department of Emergency Medicine, 703 Oxford House, 1313 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN, USA, Phone: 615-936-0087, Fax: 615-936-1316, candace.mcnaughton@vanderbilt.edu.

Authors have no relevant conflicts of interest to declare.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This study was supported by a grant from the American Heart Association.

Dr. McNaughtons time was supported by the Vanderbilt Emergency Medicine Research Training (VEMRT) Program (HL 1K12HL109019).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Social Sciences
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
  • Social Sciences, Interdisciplinary
  • Social Sciences - Other Topics
  • Hypertension control
  • Literacy
  • Medication adherence
  • Blood pressure control
  • LOW HEALTH LITERACY
  • MEDICATION ADHERENCE
  • OUTCOMES
  • IMPACT
  • NUMERACY
  • NONADHERENCE
  • PREVALENCE
  • PREDICTORS
  • KNOWLEDGE
  • AMERICAN

Low literacy is associated with uncontrolled blood pressure in primary care patients with hypertension and heart disease

Tools:

Journal Title:

Patient Education and Counseling

Volume:

Volume 96, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages 165-170

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Objectives: To evaluate the association between low literacy and uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) and their associations with medication adherence. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 423 urban, primary care patients with hypertension and coronary disease. The relationship between low literacy (Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine. ≤. 44) and uncontrolled BP (≥140/90. mmHg, ≥130/80. mmHg for patients with diabetes) was evaluated by crude and adjusted logistic regression. Relationships with self-reported adherence and refill adherence were explored using adjusted linear and logistic regression. Results: Overall, 192 (45%) subjects had low literacy and 227 (52.9%) had uncontrolled BP. Adjusting for age, gender, race, employment, education, mental status, and self-reported adherence, low literacy was associated with uncontrolled BP (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.06-2.87). Lower self-reported adherence was associated with uncontrolled BP; the relationship between refill adherence and uncontrolled BP was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Low literacy is independently associated with uncontrolled BP. Practice implications: Awareness of the relationships among patient literacy, BP control, and medication adherence may guide healthcare providers as they communicate with patients.

Copyright information:

© 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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