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Author Notes:

Ajit P. Yoganathan, Technology Enterprise Park, 387 Technology Circle, Atlanta, Georgia 30313, Phone: (404)894-2849, Fax: (404)385-1268, ajit.yoganathan@bme.gatech.edu

We acknowledge the intellectual contributions of Dr. Jorge H. Jimenez.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This study was supported by a grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (R01HL113216).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems
  • Respiratory System
  • Surgery
  • Cardiovascular System & Cardiology
  • RING DEHISCENCE
  • REGURGITATION

Suture Forces in Undersized Mitral Annuloplasty: Novel Device and Measurements

Tools:

Journal Title:

Annals of Thoracic Surgery

Volume:

Volume 98, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 305-309

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Purpose: To demonstrate the first use of a novel technology for quantifying suture forces on annuloplasty rings to better understand the mechanisms of ring dehiscence. Description: Force transducers were developed, attached to a size 24 Physio ring, and implanted in the mitral annulus of an ovine animal. Ring suture forces were measured after implantation and for cardiac cycles reaching peak left ventricular pressures (LVP) of 100, 125, and 150 mm Hg. Evaluation: After implantation of the undersized ring to the flaccid annulus, the mean suture force was 2.0 ± 0.6 N. During cyclic contraction, the anterior ring suture forces were greater than the posterior ring suture forces at peak LVPs of 100 mm Hg (4.9 ± 2.0 N vs 2.1 ± 1.1 N), 125 mm Hg (5.4 ± 2.3 N vs 2.3 ± 1.2 N), and 150 mm Hg (5.7 ± 2.4 N vs 2.4 ± 1.1 N). The largest force was 7.4 N at 150 mm Hg. Conclusions: The preliminary results demonstrate trends in annuloplasty suture forces and their variation with location and LVP. Future studies will significantly contribute to clinical knowledge by elucidating the mechanisms of ring dehiscence while improving annuloplasty ring design and surgical repair techniques.

Copyright information:

© 2014 by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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