About this item:

80 Views | 32 Downloads

Author Notes:

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Dario Maestripieri, University of Chicago, 5730 South Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637; dario@uchicago.edu.

We thank Paul Plotsky for support in the initial stages of this project.

The Yerkes Center is fully accredited by the American Association for Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care.

The authors declare no conflicting financial or other competing interests.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This research was supported by NIH Grants R01-MH62577 and K02-MH63097 (to D.M.), R21-MH01005 (to M.M.S.), and RR-00165 (to the Yerkes Center).

Support was also provided by a NARSAD Young Investigator Award (to M.M.S.).

Keywords:

  • Social Sciences
  • Psychology, Developmental
  • Psychology
  • MACAQUES MACACA-MULATTA
  • INFANT ABUSE
  • MALTREATED CHILDREN
  • SALIVARY CORTISOL
  • CHILDHOOD TRAUMA
  • HPA AXIS
  • INTERGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION
  • NEUROENDOCRINE ACTIVITY
  • EARLY EXPERIENCE
  • STRESS

Effects of sex and early maternal abuse on adrenocorticotropin hormone and cortisol responses to the corticotropin-releasing hormone challenge during the first 3 years of life in group-living rhesus monkeys

Tools:

Journal Title:

Development and Psychopathology

Volume:

Volume 22, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 45-53

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

In this study we investigated the development of the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in 21 group-living rhesus monkeys infants that were physically abused by their mothers in the first few months of life and in 21 nonabused controls. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) responses to a corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) challenge were assessed at 6-month intervals during the subjects' first 3 years of life. Abused infants exhibited greater cortisol responses to CRH than controls across the 3 years. Abused infants also exhibited blunted ACTH secretion in response to CRH, especially at 6 months of age. Although there were no significant sex differences in abuse experienced early in life, females showed a greater cortisol response to CRH than males at all ages. There were no significant sex differences in the ACTH response to CRH, or significant interactions between sex and abuse in the ACTH or cortisol response. Our findings suggest that early parental maltreatment results in greater adrenocortical, and possibly also pituitary, responsiveness to challenges later in life. These long-term alterations in neuroendocrine function may be one the mechanisms through which infant abuse results in later psychopathologies. Our study also suggests that there are developmental sex differences in adrenal function that occur irrespective of early stressful experience. The results of this study can enhance our understanding of the long-term effects of child maltreatment as well as our knowledge of the development of the HPA axis in human and nonhuman primates.

Copyright information:

© 2010 Cambridge University Press.

Export to EndNote