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Author Notes:

Corresponding Author: Michelle Woodbury, College of Public Health and Health Professions, Department of Occupational Therapy, PO Box 100164, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA, mwoodbur@phhp.ufl.edu.

The authors wish to thank Megan Briggs, OTS, College of Public Health and Health Professions, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Florida for her help with data preparation.

The author(s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the authorship and/or publication of this article.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This material is based upon work supported by the Office of Research and Development Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, Department of Veterans Affairs (Career Development-2 Award No. B-6332W, PI: Woodbury).

The EXCITE trial was funded by NIH Grant R01 HD 37606 (PI: Wolf).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Rehabilitation
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • stroke
  • rehabilitation
  • Rasch analysis
  • Wolf Motor Function Test
  • motor control
  • measurement theory
  • INDUCED MOVEMENT THERAPY
  • UPPER EXTREMITY FUNCTION
  • CONFIRMATORY FACTOR-ANALYSIS
  • FUGL-MEYER ASSESSMENT
  • STROKE RECOVERY
  • SUBACUTE STROKE
  • FIT INDEXES
  • REHABILITATION
  • TRIAL
  • TASKS

Measurement Structure of the Wolf Motor Function Test: Implications for Motor Control Theory

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Journal Title:

Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair

Volume:

Volume 24, Number 9

Publisher:

, Pages 791-801

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Background. Tools chosen to measure poststroke upper-extremity rehabilitation outcomes must match contemporary theoretical expectations of motor deficit and recovery because an assessmentg's theoretical underpinning forms the conceptual basis for interpreting its score. Objective. The purpose of this study was to investigate the theoretical framework of the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) by (1) determining whether all items measured a single underlying trait and (2) examining the congruency between the hypothesized and the empirically determined item difficulty orders. Methods. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch analysis were applied to existing WMFT Functional Ability Rating Scale data from 189 participants in the EXCITE (Extremity Constraint-Induced Therapy Evaluation) trial. Fit of a 1-factor CFA model (all items) was compared with the fit of a 2-factor CFA model (factors defined according to item object-grasp requirements) with fit indices, model comparison test, and interfactor correlations. Results. One item was missing sufficient data and therefore removed from analysis. CFA fit indices and the model-comparison test suggested that both models fit equally well. The 2-factor model yielded a strong interfactor correlation, and 13 of 14 items fit the Rasch model. The Rasch item difficulty order was consistent with the hypothesized item difficulty order. Conclusion. The results suggest that WMFT items measure a single construct. Furthermore, the results depict an item difficulty hierarchy that may advance the theoretical discussion of the person ability versus task difficulty interaction during stroke recovery.

Copyright information:

© The Author(s) 2010.

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