About this item:

27 Views | 5 Downloads

Subjects:

Research Funding:

G. K. P. is supported by National Institute of Health grants AR051372, AR052730, AR047314, and NS059340.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Developmental Biology
  • NUCLEAR-PROTEIN IMPORT
  • NF-KAPPA-B
  • DROSOPHILA NEUROMUSCULAR-JUNCTION
  • PORE-TARGETING COMPLEX
  • LOCALIZATION SIGNALS
  • CELL-CYCLE
  • IN-VIVO
  • SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE
  • STRUCTURAL BASIS
  • MESSENGER-RNA

REGULATION OF NUCLEOCYTOPLASMIC TRANSPORT IN SKELETAL MUSCLE

Tools:

Journal Title:

Current Topics in Developmental Biology:Myogenesis

Volume:

Volume 96

Publisher:

, Pages 273-302

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Proper skeletal muscle function is dependent on spatial and temporal control of gene expression in multinucleated myofibers. In addition, satellite cells, which are tissue-specific stem cells that contribute critically to repair and maintenance of skeletal muscle, are also required for normal muscle physiology. Gene expression in both myofibers and satellite cells is dependent upon nuclear proteins that require facilitated nuclear transport. A unique challenge for myofibers is controlling the transcriptional activity of hundreds of nuclei in a common cytoplasm yet achieving nuclear selectivity in transcription at specific locations such as neuromuscular synapses and myotendinous junctions. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of macromolecular cargoes is regulated by a complex interplay among various components of the nuclear transport machinery, namely nuclear pore complexes, nuclear envelope proteins, and various soluble transport receptors. The focus of this review is to highlight what is known about the nuclear transport machinery and its regulation in skeletal muscle and to consider the unique challenges that multinucleated muscle cells as well as satellite cells encounter in regulating nucleocytoplasmic transport during cell differentiation and tissue adaptation. Understanding how regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport controls gene expression in skeletal muscle may lead to further insights into the mechanisms contributing to muscle growth and maintenance throughout the lifespan of an individual.

Copyright information:

© 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Creative Commons License

Export to EndNote