About this item:

10 Views | 2 Downloads

Author Notes:

Corresponding author: William Matsui, The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1650 Orleans Street, room 245, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, Tel - 410.955.2808, Fax -410 .614.7279, matsuwi@jhmi.edu.

ZAR: conception and design and manuscript writing; JK: conception and design; BDS: conception and design; WM: conception and design and manuscript writing.

The authors apologize for omitting many important contributions to the field due to space limitations.

The authors indicate no potential conflicts of interest.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (ZAR, JK, BDS, WM), the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (ZAR), the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (JK, BDS, WM), the Lustgarten Foundation (WM), and the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (WM).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Cell & Tissue Engineering
  • Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
  • Oncology
  • Cell Biology
  • Hematology
  • Cancer stem cells
  • Metastasis
  • Drug resistance
  • Antineoplastic agents
  • CHRONIC MYELOID-LEUKEMIA
  • TUMOR-INITIATING CELLS
  • CHRONIC MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA
  • MULTIPLE-MYELOMA
  • BREAST-CANCER
  • HEDGEHOG PATHWAY
  • INTERFERON-ALPHA
  • OLDER PATIENTS
  • IMATINIB
  • CHEMOTHERAPY

Concise Review: Emerging Concepts in Clinical Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells

Tools:

Journal Title:

STEM CELLS

Volume:

Volume 29, Number 6

Publisher:

, Pages 883-887

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are functionally defined by their ability to self-renew and recapitulate tumors in the ectopic setting. They have been identified in a growing number of human malignancies and their association with poor clinical outcomes has suggested that they are the major factors in dictating clinical outcomes. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that CSCs may display other functional attributes, such as drug resistance and invasion and migration, that implicate a broad role in clinical oncology spanning initial tumor formation, relapse following treatment, and disease progression. Although our knowledge regarding the basic biology of CSCs continues to improve, proof that they are clinically relevant is still lacking, and translation of the CSC hypothesis from the laboratory to the clinic is of paramount importance. We will review current evidence supporting the role of CSCs in clinical oncology and discuss potential barriers and strategies in designing trials examining CSC-targeting agents.

Copyright information:

© AlphaMed Press.

Export to EndNote