About this item:

22 Views | 5 Downloads

Author Notes:

R. Ramasubbu, Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, TRW building, Room # 4D64, 3280 Hospital drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 4Z. Tel.: +1 403 210 6890; fax: +1 403 210 9114. rramasub@ucalgary.ca

The authors thank faculty and staff of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory University School of Medicine for the strategic, technical and collegial support.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by a Faculty Sabbatical Fellowship grant to R. Ramasubbu, MD, from the University of Calgary.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroimaging
  • Psychiatry
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Self awareness
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging
  • Insula
  • Inferior parietal lobule
  • VISUAL SELF-RECOGNITION
  • CORTICAL MIDLINE STRUCTURES
  • AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL MEMORY RETRIEVAL
  • EVENT-RELATED FMRI
  • FUNCTIONAL NEUROANATOMY
  • PARIETAL CORTEX
  • MIRROR NEURONS
  • FAMILIAR FACES
  • BRAIN
  • AWARENESS

Differential neural activity and connectivity for processing one's own face: A preliminary report

Tools:

Journal Title:

Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging

Volume:

Volume 194, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages 130-140

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

The experience of self is unique and pivotal to clinically relevant cognitive and emotional functions. However, well-controlled data on specialized brain regions and functional networks underlying the experience of self remain limited. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigated neural activity and connectivity specific to processing one's own face in healthy women by examining neural responses to the pictures of the subjects' own faces in contrast to faces of their own mothers, female friends and strangers during passive viewing, emotional and self-relevance evaluations. The processing of one's own face in comparison to processing of familiar faces revealed significant activity in right anterior insula (AI) and left inferior parietal lobule (IPL), and less activity in right posterior cingulate/precuneus (PCC/PCu) across all tasks. Further, the seed-based correlation analysis of right AI, and left IPL, showed differential functional networks in self and familiar faces contrasts. There were no differences in valence and saliency ratings between self and familiar others. Our preliminary results suggest that the self-experience cued by self-face is processed predominantly by brain regions and related networks that link interoceptive feelings and sense of body ownership to self-awareness and less by regions of higher order functioning such as autobiographical memories.

Copyright information:

© 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Creative Commons License

Export to EndNote