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Author Notes:

Melissa M. Hudson: melissa.hudson@stjude.org Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee; Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.

The authors have no conflict of interests to declare in regards to the content of this manuscript.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

St. Jude faculty members are supported in part by the Cancer Center Support (CORE) grant CA 21765 from the National Cancer Institute; and by the American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities (ALSAC).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Oncology
  • Hematology
  • Pediatrics
  • childhood cancer therapy
  • late effects
  • long-term follow-up
  • ACUTE-LYMPHOBLASTIC-LEUKEMIA
  • ACUTE MYELOID-LEUKEMIA
  • NON-HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA
  • CHILDRENS-ONCOLOGY-GROUP
  • ACUTE NONLYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA
  • FRANKFURT-MUNSTER GROUP
  • PHASE-III TRIAL
  • EFFECTIVE MULTIAGENT CHEMOTHERAPY
  • BONE-MARROW-TRANSPLANTATION
  • INVOLVED-FIELD RADIOTHERAPY

Lessons from the past: Opportunities to improve childhood cancer survivor care through outcomes investigations of historical therapeutic approaches for pediatric hematological malignancies

Tools:

Journal Title:

Pediatric Blood and Cancer

Volume:

Volume 58, Number 3

Publisher:

, Pages 334-343

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Investigations of long-term outcomes have been instrumental in designing safer and more effective contemporary therapies for pediatric hematological malignancies. Despite the significant therapeutic changes that have occurred over the last five decades, therapy modifications largely represent refinements of treatment protocols using agents and modalities that have been available for more than 30 years. This review summarizes major trends in the evolution of treatment of pediatric hematological malignancies since 1960 to support the relevance of the study of late effects of historical therapeutic approaches to the design and evaluation of contemporary treatment protocols and the follow-up of present-day survivors.

Copyright information:

© 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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