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Author Notes:

Correspondence: Michael R. Borich michael.borich@emory.edu

These authors have contributed equally to this work: LE and EK

LE and EK planned, drafted, and edited the manuscript.

CB and MB planned and edited the manuscript.

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

LE is supported by R01NS090677-04S1.

EK is supported by 2T32HD071845-06.

CB is partially supported by R01NS090677, R21NS092385, StrokeNet U24NS107234.

MB is supported by NIH NCMRR, K12HD055931, P2CCHD086844 and a Research Grant from the Foundation for Physical Therapy.

The funding for open access publication fee for this article were provided by the Emory University Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Behavioral Sciences
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • sensorimotor integration
  • motor learning
  • motor control
  • stroke
  • sensation
  • POSTERIOR PARIETAL CORTEX
  • PRIMARY MOTOR CORTEX
  • PRIMARY SOMATOSENSORY CORTEX
  • LONG-TERM POTENTIATION
  • IPSILATERAL CORTICAL CONNECTIONS
  • TEMPORARY FUNCTIONAL DEAFFERENTATION
  • DORSOMEDIAL VISUAL AREA
  • BLOOD-FLOW RESTRICTION
  • DORSAL COLUMN NUCLEI
  • UPPER-LIMB

Putting the "Sensory" Into Sensorimotor Control: The Role of Sensorimotor Integration in Goal-Directed Hand Movements After Stroke

Tools:

Journal Title:

Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience

Volume:

Volume 13

Publisher:

, Pages 16-16

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Integration of sensory and motor information is one-step, among others, that underlies the successful production of goal-directed hand movements necessary for interacting with our environment. Disruption of sensorimotor integration is prevalent in many neurologic disorders, including stroke. In most stroke survivors, persistent paresis of the hand reduces function and overall quality of life. Current rehabilitative methods are based on neuroplastic principles to promote motor learning that focuses on regaining motor function lost due to paresis, but the sensory contributions to motor control and learning are often overlooked and currently understudied. There is a need to evaluate and understand the contribution of both sensory and motor function in the rehabilitation of skilled hand movements after stroke. Here, we will highlight the importance of integration of sensory and motor information to produce skilled hand movements in healthy individuals and individuals after stroke. We will then discuss how compromised sensorimotor integration influences relearning of skilled hand movements after stroke. Finally, we will propose an approach to target sensorimotor integration through manipulation of sensory input and motor output that may have therapeutic implications.

Copyright information:

© 2019 Edwards, King, Buetefisch and Borich.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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