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Author Notes:

Jamie M. Kleinman, jamie_kleinman@yahoo.com.

We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of participating pediatricians and staff in their offices, as well as providers in the Connecticut and Massachusetts Birth-to-Three Early Intervention systems.

We would like to thank Jillian Wood, Executive Director of the Hezekiah Beardsley Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, who promoted the study state-wide, as well our dedicated undergraduate research assistants, and the children and families who participated.

We would also like to extend sincere thanks to members of the Early Detection Advisory Board, especially Ho-Wen Hsu, MD, and Mark Greenstein, MD, for their wise advice and support.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This study is supported by NIH grant R01 HD039961; and Maternal and Child Health Bureau grant R40 MC00270; and a prior grant from the National Alliance for Autism Research; and training grants from NIMH; and the Dept. of Education.

Keywords:

  • Social Sciences
  • Psychology, Developmental
  • Psychology
  • autism
  • early identification
  • pediatric screening
  • PERVASIVE DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS
  • TRAITS QUESTIONNAIRE ESAT
  • YOUNG-CHILDREN
  • DIAGNOSTIC INSTRUMENTS
  • BEHAVIORAL-PROBLEMS
  • PRESCHOOL-CHILDREN
  • AGE
  • POPULATION
  • PREVALENCE
  • AGREEMENT

The Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers: A follow-up study investigating the early detection of autism spectrum disorders

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Journal Title:

Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

Volume:

Volume 38, Number 5

Publisher:

, Pages 827-839

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often go undetected in toddlers. The Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) was used to screen 3,793 children aged 16-30 months from low- and high-risk sources; screen positive cases were diagnostically evaluated. Re-screening was performed on 1,416 children aged 42-54 months. Time1 Positive Predictive Value (PPV) was .36 for the initial screening and .74 for the screening plus follow-up telephone interview; values were similar for Time2 PPV. When separating referral sources, PPV was low for the low-risk sample but acceptable with the follow-up telephone interview. Children with ASD from the low-risk and high-risk samples were highly similar. Results indicate that the M-CHAT continues to be a promising instrument for the early detection of ASD.

Copyright information:

© 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

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