About this item:

21 Views | 7 Downloads

Author Notes:

Frederick Shic Yale Child Study Center 40 Temple St Suite 7D New Haven, CT 06510, USA Phone: (203) 764-5934 Fax: (203) 764-4373 frederick.shic@yale.edu.

We would like to thank Suzanne Macari for her insights regarding the subjects and details of this work; Warren Jones for his help in initial conceptualization of experiments from which this project grew; Amanda Mossman and Tina Goldsmith for their contribution to subject characterization; Marika Coffman, Mairin Melvedt, Jessica Reed, Brittany Butler, Rebecca Doggett, Paula Ogston, and Joslin Latz for obtaining data of the highest quality; Lindsey Szauter for her assistance in analysis; and the children and families, without whom this study and others would not be possible.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

The study was supported by NIMH grant T32 MH18268 (to FS); P50 MH 081756 (Autism Centers of Excellence) project 2 (PI: KC); NICHD P01 HD 003008 Project 1 (PI: KC); Autism Speaks and the NAAR foundation (to KC); and the National Science Foundation CDI award #0835767 (PIs: KC & BS).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Activity monitoring
  • Autism
  • Eye-tracking
  • Joint attention
  • Social learning
  • Observational learning
  • JOINT ATTENTION
  • YOUNG-CHILDREN
  • LANGUAGE-DEVELOPMENT
  • PRESCHOOL-CHILDREN
  • BIOLOGICAL MOTION
  • NEURAL MECHANISMS
  • SOCIAL ATTENTION
  • ACTION IMITATION
  • FACE PERCEPTION
  • DIRECTED ACTION

Limited activity monitoring in toddlers with autism spectrum disorder

Tools:

Journal Title:

Brain Research

Volume:

Volume 1380

Publisher:

, Pages 246-254

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

This study used eye-tracking to examine how 20-month-old toddlers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (n = 28), typical development (TD) (n = 34), and non-autistic developmental delays (DD) (n = 16) monitored the activities occurring in a context of an adult-child play interaction. Toddlers with ASD, in comparison to control groups, showed less attention to the activities of others and focused more on background objects (e.g., toys). In addition, while all groups spent the same time overall looking at people, toddlers with ASD looked less at people's heads and more at their bodies. In ASD, these patterns were associated with cognitive deficits and greater autism severity. These results suggest that the monitoring of the social activities of others is disrupted early in the developmental progression of autism, limiting future avenues for observational learning.

Copyright information:

© 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Creative Commons License

Export to EndNote