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Author Notes:

Elizabeth J. Corwin, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean and Professor, 1520 Clifton Road NE, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Atlanta, GA 30322 (Elizabeth.j.corwin@emory.edu).

The authors have no conflicts of interest to report.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

The authors acknowledge this work was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Nursing Research (R01NR014800).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Nursing
  • biology
  • birth
  • development
  • gastrointestinal tract
  • microbiome
  • newborn
  • FORMULA-FED INFANTS
  • LONG-TERM IMPACTS
  • REAL-TIME PCR
  • GUT MICROBIOTA
  • INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA
  • NECROTIZING ENTEROCOLITIS
  • FECAL MICROBIOTA
  • CESAREAN-SECTION
  • PRETERM INFANTS
  • STRESS-RESPONSE

The Infant Microbiome Implications for Infant Health and Neurocognitive Development

Tools:

Journal Title:

Nursing Research

Volume:

Volume 65, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 76-88

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Background: Beginning at birth, the microbes in the gut perform essential duties related to the digestion and metabolism of food, the development and activation of the immune system, and the production of neurotransmitters that affect behavior and cognitive function. Objectives: The objectives of this review are to (a) provide a brief overview of the microbiome and the "microbiome-gut-brain axis"; (b) discuss factors known to affect the composition of the infant microbiome: mode of delivery, antibiotic exposure, and infant-feeding patterns; and (c) present research priorities for nursing science and clinical implications for infant health and neurocognitive development. Discussion: The gut microbiome influences immunological, endocrine, and neural pathways and plays an important role in infant development. Several factors influence colonization of the infant gut microbiome. Different microbial colonization patterns are associated with vaginal versus surgical birth, exposure to antibiotics, and infant-feeding patterns. Because of extensive physiological influence, infant microbial colonization patterns have the potential to impact physical and neurocognitive development and life course disease risk. Understanding these influences will inform newborn care and parental education.

Copyright information:

© 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

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