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Author Notes:

S. Shultz: sarah.shultz@emory.edu

And W. Jones: warren.jones@emory.edu

We would also like to thank Torrey Cohenour, Aiden Ford, Drew Kreuzman, Sarah Markert, Megan Micheletti, and Jack Olmstead, for helpful comments on the manuscript; as well as Emily Ryu for assistance in gathering infant developmental milestone data.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by grants from the National Institute of Mental Health: NIMH R21 MH105816; NIMH P50 MH100029; NIMH 2P50 MH100029–6; and NIMH K01 MH108741.

Additional support provided by the Marcus Foundation; the Whitehead Foundation; the Simons Foundation; and the Georgia Research Alliance.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Social Sciences
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Behavioral Sciences
  • Neurosciences
  • Psychology, Experimental
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Psychology
  • TO-FACE INTERACTION
  • LOW GENETIC RISK
  • SPECTRUM DISORDER
  • BRAIN-DEVELOPMENT
  • DEVELOPMENTAL-CHANGES
  • EXPLORATORY-BEHAVIOR
  • BIOLOGICAL MOTION
  • NEWBORN-INFANTS
  • VISUAL FIXATION
  • MOTHERS FACE

Neonatal Transitions in Social Behavior and Their Implications for Autism

Tools:

Journal Title:

Trends in Cognitive Sciences

Volume:

Volume 22, Number 5

Publisher:

, Pages 452-469

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Within the context of early infant–caregiver interaction, we review a series of pivotal transitions that occur within the first 6 months of typical infancy, with emphasis on behavior and brain mechanisms involved in preferential orientation towards, and interaction with, other people. Our goal in reviewing these transitions is to better understand how they may lay a necessary and/or sufficient groundwork for subsequent phases of development, and also to understand how the breakdown thereof, when development is atypical and those transitions become derailed, may instead yield disability. We review these developmental processes in light of recent studies documenting disruptions to early-emerging brain and behavior mechanisms in infants later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, shedding light on the brain–behavior pathogenesis of autism.

Copyright information:

© 2018 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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