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Author Notes:

Roberto Pacifici, M.D., Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Lipids, Emory University School of Medicine, 101 Woodruff Circle, Room 1309, Atlanta, GA 30322, Telephone: 404-712-8420, Fax: 404-727-1300, roberto.pacifici@emory.edu.

The authors have declared that no conflict of interest exists.

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Endocrinology & Metabolism
  • Estrogen
  • Sex steroids
  • Microbiota
  • Intestine
  • Bone loss
  • Probiotics
  • LGG
  • VSL#3 (TM)
  • BLOOD MONONUCLEAR-CELLS
  • LOSS IN-VIVO
  • ESTROGEN DEFICIENCY
  • GUT MICROBIOTA
  • T-CELLS
  • CALCIUM-ABSORPTION
  • MINERAL DENSITY
  • OSTEOCLAST FORMATION
  • INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY
  • TNF-ALPHA

From Osteoimmunology to Osteomicrobiology: How the Microbiota and the Immune System Regulate Bone

Tools:

Journal Title:

Calcified Tissue International

Volume:

Volume 102, Number 5

Publisher:

, Pages 512-521

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Osteomicrobiology refers to the role of microbiota in bone health and the mechanisms by which the microbiota regulates post-natal skeletal development, bone aging, and pathologic bone loss. Here, we review recent reports linking gut microbiota to changes in bone phenotype. A pro-inflammatory cytokine milieu drives bone resorption in conditions such as sex steroid hormone deficiency. The response of the immune system to activation by the microbiome results in increased circulating osteoclastogenic cytokines in a T cell-dependent mechanism. Additionally, gut microbiota affect bone homeostasis through nutrient absorption, mediation of the IGF-1 pathway, and short chain fatty acid and metabolic products. Manipulation of microbiota through prebiotics or probiotics reduces inflammatory cytokine production, leading to changes in bone density. One mechanism of probiotic action is through upregulating tight junction proteins, increasing the strength of the gut epithelial layer, and leading to less antigen presentation and less activation of intestinal immune cells. Thus, prebiotics or probiotics may represent a future therapeutic avenue for ameliorating the risk of postmenopausal bone loss in humans.

Copyright information:

© 2017, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

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