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Author Notes:

Correspondance: chhubs01@louisville.edu

Acknowledgments: The authors would like to acknowledge James Armstrong, Jason Fell, Darlene Burke, Yangsheng Chen, and Johnny Morehouse for technical and surgical assistance.

Competing Interests: The authors declare no conflict of interests regarding the publication of this paper.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work is supported by grants from the NIH NCRR Grant RR015576 (C. H. Hubscher), NRSA Grant F31NS070329 (P. J. Ward), and Department of Defense (C. H. Hubscher).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • SPINAL-CORD-INJURY
  • DIABETIC PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY
  • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • AT-LEVEL ALLODYNIA
  • LOCOMOTOR RECOVERY
  • ADULT-RAT
  • COMPRESSION-INJURY
  • AEROBIC EXERCISE
  • CONTUSED RATS
  • SINGLE-BLIND

Training-Induced Functional Gains following SCI

Tools:

Journal Title:

Neural Plasticity

Volume:

Volume 2016

Publisher:

, Pages 4307694-4307694

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

We previously demonstrated that daily, hour-long training sessions significantly improved both locomotor (limb kinematics, gait, and hindlimb flexor-extensor bursting patterns) and nonlocomotor (bladder function and at-level mechanical allodynia) functions following a moderate contusive spinal cord injury. The amount of training needed to achieve this recovery is unknown. Furthermore, whether this recovery is induced primarily by neuronal activity below the lesion or other aspects related to general exercise is unclear. Therefore, the current study objectives were to (1) test the efficacy of 30 minutes of step training for recovery following a clinically relevant contusion injury in male Wistar rats and (2) test the efficacy of training without hindlimb engagement. The results indicate that as little as 30 minutes of step training six days per week enhances overground locomotion in male rats with contusive spinal cord injury but does not alter allodynia or bladder function. Thirty minutes of forelimb-only exercise did not alter locomotion, allodynia, or bladder function, and neither training protocol altered the amount of in-cage activity. Taken together, locomotor improvements were facilitated by hindlimb step training for 30 minutes, but longer durations of training are required to affect nonlocomotor systems.

Copyright information:

© 2016 P. J. Ward et al.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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