About this item:

41 Views | 16 Downloads

Author Notes:

This chapter is dedicated to Peter K. Vogt in honor of his 50 years as an Editor of Current Topics of Microbiology and Immunology, his continued contributions to science and 45 years of mentorship and friendship.

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Oncology
  • Genetics & Heredity
  • Virology
  • SIMIAN-IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS
  • INFECTIOUS MOLECULAR CLONES
  • TRANSMITTED FOUNDER HIV-1
  • MUCOSAL HOMING RECEPTOR
  • T-LYMPHOCYTE RESPONSE
  • HETEROSEXUAL TRANSMISSION
  • REPLICATION CAPACITY
  • VIRAL-LOAD
  • ESCAPE MUTATIONS
  • TYPE-1 INFECTION

Virus-Host Gene Interactions Define HIV-1 Disease Progression

Tools:

Journal Title:

Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology

Volume:

Volume 407

Publisher:

, Pages 31-63

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

In this chapter, we will review recent research on the virology of HIV-1 transmission and the impact of the transmitted virus genotype on subsequent disease progression. In most instances of HIV-1 sexual transmission, a single genetic variant, or a very limited number of variants from the diverse viral quasi-species present in the transmitting partner establishes systemic infection. Transmission involves both stochastic and selective processes, such that in general a minority variant in the donor is transmitted. While there is clear evidence for selection, the biological properties that mediate transmission remain incompletely defined. Nevertheless, the genotype of the transmitted founder virus, which reflects prior exposure to and escape from host immune responses, clearly influences disease progression. Some escape mutations impact replicative capacity, while others effectively cloak the virus from the newly infected host’s immune response by preventing recognition. It is the balance between the impact of escape mutations on viral fitness and susceptibility to the host immunogenetics that defines HIV-1 disease progression.

Copyright information:

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017.

Export to EndNote