About this item:

45 Views | 34 Downloads

Author Notes:

Correspondence to: Melinda C Power, ScD, George Washington University Milken Institute of Public Health, 950 New Hampshire Avenue NW, 5th Floor, Washington DC 20052, melindacpower@gmail.com T: 202.994.7778 F: 202.994.0082.

We thank the staff and participants of the ARIC study for their important contributions.

We also thank Dr. Pamela Lutsey for providing the dietary pattern scores.

Dr. Power and Dr. Mosley report grants from NIH, during conduct of the study; no financial relationships with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work in the previous three years; and no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

Dr. Coresh reports grants from NIH and NKF, during the conduct of the study; grants from NIH, grants from NKF, outside the submitted work; In addition, Dr. Coresh has a patent PCT/US2015/044567 Provisional patent [Coresh, Inker and Levey] filed 8/15/2014 -- Precise estimation of glomerular filtration rate from multiple biomarkers issued.

Dr. Gottesman reports no support from any organization for the submitted work; personal fees from Neurology journal, where she serves as Associate Editor, outside the submitted work; and no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

Dr. Ballantyne, Dr. Sharrett, Dr. Rawlings, Dr. Alonso, Dr. Pokharel and Dr. Penman report no support from any organization for the submitted work; no financial relationships with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work in the previous three years; no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

Dr. Michos reports no support from any organization for the submitted work; personal fees from Siemens Diagnostics, outside the submitted work; and no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

Dr. Knopman reports no support from any organization for the submitted work; personal fees from DIAN study DSMB, personal fees from Lundbeck AD drug DSMB, outside the submitted work; and no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

Dr. Bandeen-Roche reports grants from NIH, during the conduct of the study; grants from NIH, outside the submitted work; and no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

C Power was supported by the National Institute of Aging (T32 AG027668).

The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study is carried out as a collaborative study supported by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute contracts (HHSN268201100005C, HHSN268201100006C, HHSN268201100007C, HHSN268201100008C, HHSN268201100009C, HHSN268201100010C, HHSN268201100011C, and HHSN268201100012C).

Neurocognitive data is collected by U01 HL096812, HL096814, HL096899, HL096902, HL096917 with previous brain MRI examinations funded by R01-HL70825.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Lipids
  • Cognition
  • Dementia
  • Epidemiology
  • Cohort
  • Longitudinal
  • Cognitive decline
  • Cognitive change
  • Cholesterol
  • DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL
  • IMPROVED LIPOLYTIC EFFICIENCY
  • CARDIOVASCULAR RISK-FACTORS
  • SERUM TOTAL CHOLESTEROL
  • E EPSILON-4 ALLELE
  • ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
  • ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK
  • PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
  • LATE-LIFE
  • ENZYMATIC DETERMINATION

Association of midlife lipids with 20-year cognitive change: A cohort study

Show all authors Show less authors

Tools:

Journal Title:

Alzheimer's and Dementia

Volume:

Volume 14, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages 167-177

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Introduction Existing studies predominantly consider the association of late-life lipid levels and subsequent cognitive change. However, midlife rather than late-life risk factors are often most relevant to cognitive health. Methods We quantified the association between measured serum lipids in midlife and subsequent 20-year change in performance on three cognitive tests in 13,997 participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. Results Elevated total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were associated with greater 20-year decline on a test of executive function, sustained attention, and processing speed. Higher total cholesterol and triglycerides were also associated with greater 20-year decline in memory scores and a measure summarizing performance on all three tests. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was not associated with cognitive change. Results were materially unchanged in sensitivity analyses addressing informative missingness. Discussion Elevated total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides in midlife were associated with greater 20-year cognitive decline.

Copyright information:

© 2017 the Alzheimer's Association

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Creative Commons License

Export to EndNote