About this item:

36 Views | 36 Downloads

Author Notes:

Corresponding Author: michael.davis@bme.emory.edu

The authors declare no competing financial interest.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by grant HL127236 to A.J.G. and M.E.D.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Technology
  • Materials Science, Biomaterials
  • Materials Science
  • stem cell
  • biomaterials
  • hydrogel
  • integrin
  • cardiac progenitor cell
  • MESENCHYMAL STEM-CELLS
  • MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION
  • ISCHEMIC CARDIOMYOPATHY
  • HEART
  • BIOMATERIALS
  • ENGRAFTMENT
  • DIFFERENTIATION
  • TRANSPLANTATION
  • VASCULARIZATION
  • CARDIOMYOCYTES

Evaluation of Hydrogels Presenting Extracellular Matrix-Derived Adhesion Peptides and Encapsulating Cardiac Progenitor Cells for Cardiac Repair

Tools:

Journal Title:

ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering

Volume:

Volume 4, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 200-210

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Cell therapy is an emerging paradigm for the treatment of heart disease. In spite of the exciting and promising preclinical results, the benefits of cell therapy for cardiac repair in patients have been modest at best. Biomaterials-based approaches may overcome the barriers of poor differentiation and retention of transplanted cells. In this study, we prepared and tested hydrogels presenting extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived adhesion peptides as delivery vehicles for c-kit+ cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). We assessed their effects on cell behavior in vitro as well as cardiac repair in rats undergoing ischemia reperfusion. Hydrogels presenting the collagen-derived GFOGER peptide induced cardiomyocyte differentiation of CPCs as demonstrated by increased expression of cardiomyocyte structural proteins. However, conditioned media obtained from GFOGER hydrogels showed lower levels of secreted reparative factors. Interestingly, following injection in rats undergoing ischemia-reperfusion, treatment with CPCs encapsulated in nonadhesive RDG-presenting hydrogels resulted in the preservation of cardiac contractility and attenuation of postinfarct remodeling whereas the adhesion peptide-presenting hydrogels did not induce any functional improvement. Retention of cells was significantly higher when delivered with nonadhesive hydrogels compared to ECM-derived peptide gels. These data suggest that factors including cell differentiation state, paracrine factors and interaction with biomaterials influence the effectiveness of biomaterials-based cell therapy. A holistic consideration of these multiple variables should be included in cell-biomaterial combination therapy designs.

Copyright information:

© 2017 American Chemical Society.

Export to EndNote